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+3 on the tracker, the thing is an Ascot fer crying out loud. I know its a shafty, not ideal but who gives a rats? one of the locals up here dirt tracks a 500 guzzi and no one is having more fun. point is you scored a nice bike for beer money. don't pooch it by going the "I want it to look like this no fender fat tire" pin up queen route. make it safe and reliable, ride the hell out of it, learn what you must to continue riding the hell out of it, and have fun. cheers, bcr
 

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Tough crowd around here.

I tend to agree that where you want to get to, that the VT is probably not the best place to start. That XS Yamaha is really clean and leaving aside some of teh ground clearnace issues, it looks good. Minimalist which captures some of the essence of cafe racers.

For a city ride, A Tracker probably makes more sense. The inspiration comes from the same desire to make a bike that looks light and functional - just a different type of race track look.

That said, it's your bike and most of us started on something completely inappropriate and made it worse in the process (well I did at least). Each successive build I learned something more about what worked and what didn't. It took me a lot longer to get the design elements clear in my head and finally that start to make sense.

I spend way too much time looking at other bikes for design clues and ideas that i could incorporate or modify for my needs. Check out the XS and ask yourself what about that appeals to you and what elements of teh design you might be able to use in your build.

before photoshop, I used to print copies of the bike I was working on and I'd get out teh crayons.pens, whatever and draw shapes and colors and work out what worked and I usually managed to work out what I wanted to do. "All" I had to do then was work out how to make it work in the real world.

To me, a lot of the fun is in the planning and problem solving and learning.

And maybe it's time to see a VT500 cafe racer. It's your bike and your imagination that will be working overtime. Be safe and have fun.
 

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quote:Originally posted by Judeyramone

Isn't a Hawk GT (NT650) the same motor, bored out to 650? Honda has made many uglier bikes than the VT500.
it is a variant of it, to a certain degree, but hard to say what swaps over since all honda twins carry the VT designation. Also the 650 hawk is chain drive while the VT500 is shaftie. Also the 650 mill in the hawk was not the strongest thing going for it. People love the hawk for the chassis, not the engine.

The closest thing to the VT500 ascot was the VT500 shadow crusier. the shadow even shares a wheel design with the hawk but the rear is a 16".
 

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Hey, I happen to love my ascot, but these guys are telling the truth, to much fab to make a cafe out of it. The ascot above is by some cat named "lennyway" ? It has fork change to make room for the new rubber. I love the looks of it, is there any more info on it.

Nice score on your ascot, but do not cut it up and leave it to rot.

Robert
 

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stolen pic:


Yeah wow.....that's pretty!
 

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Discussion Starter #30
quote:Originally posted by Teazer

Tough crowd around here.

I tend to agree that where you want to get to, that the VT is probably not the best place to start. That XS Yamaha is really clean and leaving aside some of teh ground clearnace issues, it looks good. Minimalist which captures some of the essence of cafe racers.

For a city ride, A Tracker probably makes more sense. The inspiration comes from the same desire to make a bike that looks light and functional - just a different type of race track look.

That said, it's your bike and most of us started on something completely inappropriate and made it worse in the process (well I did at least). Each successive build I learned something more about what worked and what didn't. It took me a lot longer to get the design elements clear in my head and finally that start to make sense.

I spend way too much time looking at other bikes for design clues and ideas that i could incorporate or modify for my needs. Check out the XS and ask yourself what about that appeals to you and what elements of teh design you might be able to use in your build.

before photoshop, I used to print copies of the bike I was working on and I'd get out teh crayons.pens, whatever and draw shapes and colors and work out what worked and I usually managed to work out what I wanted to do. "All" I had to do then was work out how to make it work in the real world.

To me, a lot of the fun is in the planning and problem solving and learning.

And maybe it's time to see a VT500 cafe racer. It's your bike and your imagination that will be working overtime. Be safe and have fun.
Thanks for the words. A tracker would be cooler (def. arguably more functional on city streets) so I'll try to compromise and add parts that have both function and aesthetics. Personally, I love cafe racers, always have, so I'm sure it's going to be cafed out lol.

The first thing that are definitely to go are the handlebars, rear fender and bars...been thinking of getting clipons...thoughts?
 

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That last picture is gorgeous. Nicely done. The G50 style seat works really well and the whole thing looks integrated.
 

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Starting with the handlebars are a rookie noob mistake. You need to think of your riding position as a whole, not just seperate out one bit because it is easy and cheap to change. I wouldn't go lower than a superbike or drag bar if I were you unless you are ready to change the seat and the pegs as well.

one thing to note is on all but one of the custom ascots that have been posted here the rear frame has been cut to accomidate the seat/fender setup. it is important that you already have your seat/fender in your hands and ready for mockup before you chop the rear.
 

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Gambler: Shiny ascot was posted elsewhere......
 

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The above cafe style Ascot (alloy tank) info to follow:

Owner and Builder: Chris Moore
Specs:


1. Custom twin exhaust system using chrome Shadow header pipes with 17”
Emgo megaphone style mufflers. Custom pipes fabricated to join headers
to mufflers.
2. K&N air filter and DynoJet jetting kit.
3. Seat from a 1989/90 Honda GB500 with about 1” removed from the front
to allow for a longer tank.
4. Gas tank and side covers were custom made by Fred Muhlenhort of
Racetec in Oxnard, California near where I live. They are strictly
one-off items that Fred designed after I showed him photos of the look I
was going for. Fred makes a lot of the gas tanks for AMA Pro Flat
Trackers among other things.
5. Raask (Sweden) rearset foot pegs.
6. Tommaselli adjustable clip-ons. I’d like them lower for the true
look, but at my age my back can’t take them much lower, so a compromise.
Front suspension is stock, albeit moved up about 30mm to accommodate the
clip-ons mounted above the triple tree.
7. Alloy headlight brackets (Tommaselli copies) with a 7” classic
British headlight assembly.
8. Stainless steel mini speedometer and tachometer. The speedo has
warning lights for oil pressure, high beam, neutral and turn signals.
9. Handlebar mounts removed from top triple tree and then polished. The
fuses were relocated to inside the headlight.
10. Both wheels stripped of the black paint to the natural aluminum.
11. Norton Commando fork boots.
12. Lower fork legs polished.
13. Digital water temperature gauge.
14. Alloy fenders, front and rear, with hand fabricated mounts.
15. Lucas type alloy tail light.
16. Hagon rear shocks.
17. Stainless steel front brake line (not fitted in photos).
18. Roller bearing headset
19. Lots of time and TLC!

Hope you like it!

Chris
 

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quote:Originally posted by svorsp


4. Gas tank and side covers were custom made by Fred Muhlenhort of
Racetec in Oxnard, California near where I live. They are strictly
one-off items that Fred designed after I showed him photos of the look I was going for. Fred makes a lot of the gas tanks for AMA Pro Flat
Trackers among other things.
That must have cost more than any Ascot is ever going to be worth. I know evan wilcox's tanks started at $1200 and for custom shit way more than that. Even if that guy gave Fred a world class Blojowski to get the price down that tank still had to cost over a grand. Just the tank.

At that cost, why not just buy a GB500?
 

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maybe it's what he had? Perhaps he likes the bike?
Who knows, but it's a damn pretty bike and as much as anyone may like a GB, you're more likely to pass your twin on a GB then you are on this thing.
 

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I am going to go out on a limb and say a conservative ball park cost on building that ascot cafe bike is about $5000 (and really this is just throwing a figure out into the wind). I can think of a lot of other V-twin powered bikes I would like to spend $5K on making look that cool.

I used to know of 2 GB500s in a city of 8 million people. Right now I only know of one. If I see a GB500 I am usually impressed, period.
 

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Just speaking for me and to see myself type. I am impressed with the time and work that has gone into his bike. I do not think cost or recovery of cost goes into what we love to work on by ourselves. I am not a Harley fan, even close, but I do admire the hard work those builders put into those oil marking trailer queens. I would love to have a GB500, who wouldn't, but if we all liked the same thing, the world sure would be boring. If so many people didn't like jeeps, I would not have any one to pull out with my Bronco. The various bikes on this site may not be my first choice of what to work, but I sure do like what you guys see in them and do to them, keep it up all of you.

Robert
 
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