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Discussion Starter #21
Here are some pics of my favorite bikes. I would love to own one that looks anything like one of these.





The top one is my favorite out of all three. What type of bike would I have to buy if I wanted the end product to look like the top one?

I know that its far, far away but I would like to have a goal to aim for.
 

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Discussion Starter #22
So I've had a little change in plans here and want to know what you guys think I should do. Due to something that just came up I think that I will only be able to afford a $1000 bike. I might be able to go as high as $1500. I am still not a fan of the new school sport bikes and would like to get a older one. So for a price limit of $1000 what could I get that has great cafe potential but will still run and look good stock? Again I am 6'3" and weight 180 pounds and plan to do mostly highway/town riding. I also wouldn't mind having something that is a hit among the ladies :D.
 

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Discussion Starter #23
So I've had a little change in plans here and want to know what you guys think I should do. Due to something that just came up I think that I will only be able to afford a $1000 bike. I might be able to go as high as $1500. I am still not a fan of the new school sport bikes and would like to get a older one. So for a price limit of $1000 what could I get that has great cafe potential but will still run and look good stock? Again I am 6'3" and weight 180 pounds and plan to do mostly highway/town riding. I also wouldn't mind having something that is a hit among the ladies :D.
 

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that last line means you're down to 1200 for the bike 'cause 300 went to chaps w/ conchos.
cheers, bcr
 

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that last line means you're down to 1200 for the bike 'cause 300 went to chaps w/ conchos.
cheers, bcr
 

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seriously, shut up about the "new school" sport bike thing arleady - it is in every one of your goddamn posts.

so let's get this straight: you are 19, never worked on bikes before, never ridden before, and you want a cafe racer? let's break this down.

Cafe racers are not beginner bikes. I don't care how tough you are, I don't care how cool you think you will look, or how fast a learner you may be, because of the combination of 20-30+years of wearing out parts, combined with a racer's riding position (in some cases poorly done due to budget constraints) make the bikes twitchy and unpredictable. Plus the riding position tends to encourage bad habits, so you need to have the good habits in place before you move to something more advanced.

Ninja 250. Well the bike is a freaking solid beginner motorcycle and you don't like it because of new school....blah blah blah. you know what you can always sell it later on once you have learned to ride. Thanks to the increase in fuel prices there will always be a market for it, but unfortunately this may also mean that good ones might be slightly out of your range right now. At least you have the end of season going for you.

Old. Well, if you have never worked on old bikes or anything for that matter don't buy an old bike. Even the best running examples (which you can't afford anyway for $1000) are prone to give you fits where you will have to fix something that may be over your head. on a $1000 bike this may mean that a shop repair bill (if you can find a shop to work on an old bike) can exceed your bikes value quick.

size. At 6'3" you are better off looking at some of the bigger bikes out there. Honda cbs are always a good choice but I would look at the 750s.

You budget is a killer. It would have been possible to find an SRX fairly easily for under $2K, but for $1000 you may not want any SRX you find. The only old bikes I would recommend at that price range are the GS550 and GS750, as well as the KZ650 (or even the GPZ550). none of these look exactly like what you want because what you want is a new triumph bonneville (two of the three pics you posted are new bonnies). For a while the oldest of the new bonnies were trading around 2K (they are almost 10 year old motorcycles by now), so if you save your pennies and hold off another year and can save up maybe you can find one.
 

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seriously, shut up about the "new school" sport bike thing arleady - it is in every one of your goddamn posts.

so let's get this straight: you are 19, never worked on bikes before, never ridden before, and you want a cafe racer? let's break this down.

Cafe racers are not beginner bikes. I don't care how tough you are, I don't care how cool you think you will look, or how fast a learner you may be, because of the combination of 20-30+years of wearing out parts, combined with a racer's riding position (in some cases poorly done due to budget constraints) make the bikes twitchy and unpredictable. Plus the riding position tends to encourage bad habits, so you need to have the good habits in place before you move to something more advanced.

Ninja 250. Well the bike is a freaking solid beginner motorcycle and you don't like it because of new school....blah blah blah. you know what you can always sell it later on once you have learned to ride. Thanks to the increase in fuel prices there will always be a market for it, but unfortunately this may also mean that good ones might be slightly out of your range right now. At least you have the end of season going for you.

Old. Well, if you have never worked on old bikes or anything for that matter don't buy an old bike. Even the best running examples (which you can't afford anyway for $1000) are prone to give you fits where you will have to fix something that may be over your head. on a $1000 bike this may mean that a shop repair bill (if you can find a shop to work on an old bike) can exceed your bikes value quick.

size. At 6'3" you are better off looking at some of the bigger bikes out there. Honda cbs are always a good choice but I would look at the 750s.

You budget is a killer. It would have been possible to find an SRX fairly easily for under $2K, but for $1000 you may not want any SRX you find. The only old bikes I would recommend at that price range are the GS550 and GS750, as well as the KZ650 (or even the GPZ550). none of these look exactly like what you want because what you want is a new triumph bonneville (two of the three pics you posted are new bonnies). For a while the oldest of the new bonnies were trading around 2K (they are almost 10 year old motorcycles by now), so if you save your pennies and hold off another year and can save up maybe you can find one.
 

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Discussion Starter #28
quote:Originally posted by Geeto67

seriously, shut up about the "new school" sport bike thing arleady - it is in every one of your goddamn posts.

so let's get this straight: you are 19, never worked on bikes before, never ridden before, and you want a cafe racer? let's break this down.

Cafe racers are not beginner bikes. I don't care how tough you are, I don't care how cool you think you will look, or how fast a learner you may be, because of the combination of 20-30+years of wearing out parts, combined with a racer's riding position (in some cases poorly done due to budget constraints) make the bikes twitchy and unpredictable. Plus the riding position tends to encourage bad habits, so you need to have the good habits in place before you move to something more advanced.

Ninja 250. Well the bike is a freaking solid beginner motorcycle and you don't like it because of new school....blah blah blah. you know what you can always sell it later on once you have learned to ride. Thanks to the increase in fuel prices there will always be a market for it, but unfortunately this may also mean that good ones might be slightly out of your range right now. At least you have the end of season going for you.

Old. Well, if you have never worked on old bikes or anything for that matter don't buy an old bike. Even the best running examples (which you can't afford anyway for $1000) are prone to give you fits where you will have to fix something that may be over your head. on a $1000 bike this may mean that a shop repair bill (if you can find a shop to work on an old bike) can exceed your bikes value quick.

size. At 6'3" you are better off looking at some of the bigger bikes out there. Honda cbs are always a good choice but I would look at the 750s.

You budget is a killer. It would have been possible to find an SRX fairly easily for under $2K, but for $1000 you may not want any SRX you find. The only old bikes I would recommend at that price range are the GS550 and GS750, as well as the KZ650 (or even the GPZ550). none of these look exactly like what you want because what you want is a new triumph bonneville (two of the three pics you posted are new bonnies). For a while the oldest of the new bonnies were trading around 2K (they are almost 10 year old motorcycles by now), so if you save your pennies and hold off another year and can save up maybe you can find one.
Haha... Alright, I'll shut up about me not liking the new style of bikes. I've just had it impounded into my brain from family and friends that they are no good compared to the older bikes. I should of just came here first and had you guys teach me right instead of listening to the Harley lovers in my family.

So would it just be a better idea for me to wait a bit and try to save up that $2000 again? I've been waiting 19 years to own a bike of my own so the thought of waiting any more is a killer.

Thanks for the long reply too. I appreciate all of the information.
 

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Discussion Starter #29
quote:Originally posted by Geeto67

seriously, shut up about the "new school" sport bike thing arleady - it is in every one of your goddamn posts.

so let's get this straight: you are 19, never worked on bikes before, never ridden before, and you want a cafe racer? let's break this down.

Cafe racers are not beginner bikes. I don't care how tough you are, I don't care how cool you think you will look, or how fast a learner you may be, because of the combination of 20-30+years of wearing out parts, combined with a racer's riding position (in some cases poorly done due to budget constraints) make the bikes twitchy and unpredictable. Plus the riding position tends to encourage bad habits, so you need to have the good habits in place before you move to something more advanced.

Ninja 250. Well the bike is a freaking solid beginner motorcycle and you don't like it because of new school....blah blah blah. you know what you can always sell it later on once you have learned to ride. Thanks to the increase in fuel prices there will always be a market for it, but unfortunately this may also mean that good ones might be slightly out of your range right now. At least you have the end of season going for you.

Old. Well, if you have never worked on old bikes or anything for that matter don't buy an old bike. Even the best running examples (which you can't afford anyway for $1000) are prone to give you fits where you will have to fix something that may be over your head. on a $1000 bike this may mean that a shop repair bill (if you can find a shop to work on an old bike) can exceed your bikes value quick.

size. At 6'3" you are better off looking at some of the bigger bikes out there. Honda cbs are always a good choice but I would look at the 750s.

You budget is a killer. It would have been possible to find an SRX fairly easily for under $2K, but for $1000 you may not want any SRX you find. The only old bikes I would recommend at that price range are the GS550 and GS750, as well as the KZ650 (or even the GPZ550). none of these look exactly like what you want because what you want is a new triumph bonneville (two of the three pics you posted are new bonnies). For a while the oldest of the new bonnies were trading around 2K (they are almost 10 year old motorcycles by now), so if you save your pennies and hold off another year and can save up maybe you can find one.
Haha... Alright, I'll shut up about me not liking the new style of bikes. I've just had it impounded into my brain from family and friends that they are no good compared to the older bikes. I should of just came here first and had you guys teach me right instead of listening to the Harley lovers in my family.

So would it just be a better idea for me to wait a bit and try to save up that $2000 again? I've been waiting 19 years to own a bike of my own so the thought of waiting any more is a killer.

Thanks for the long reply too. I appreciate all of the information.
 

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you can listen to all people, in the end though think for yourself and make an INFORMED decision.

Try to save up as much as you can. If you can get close to $3K then you can probably get a really nice stock used newer bonneville which it seems is what you really want anyway. In the meantime look for an xs650 while you save and if one comes along you can always pick that up instead and sell when you think you have enough for a bonneville.

There is something to be said for an old bike. A lot of them have great and unique riding expirences. However a lot of them are old now too and don't always make good beginner bikes. stuff dry rots, things work harden, and a once excellent chassis can be a little unpredictable over time. If you go through and restore the bike then you get like new handling, but the stuff from the 1980s/90s is cheap, hasn't deteriorated like the stuff from the 70s yet, and will help you get on wheels. Once you are on wheels you will find that you can horse trade, and do all sorts of stuff - but you need to learn to ride first.
 

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you can listen to all people, in the end though think for yourself and make an INFORMED decision.

Try to save up as much as you can. If you can get close to $3K then you can probably get a really nice stock used newer bonneville which it seems is what you really want anyway. In the meantime look for an xs650 while you save and if one comes along you can always pick that up instead and sell when you think you have enough for a bonneville.

There is something to be said for an old bike. A lot of them have great and unique riding expirences. However a lot of them are old now too and don't always make good beginner bikes. stuff dry rots, things work harden, and a once excellent chassis can be a little unpredictable over time. If you go through and restore the bike then you get like new handling, but the stuff from the 1980s/90s is cheap, hasn't deteriorated like the stuff from the 70s yet, and will help you get on wheels. Once you are on wheels you will find that you can horse trade, and do all sorts of stuff - but you need to learn to ride first.
 

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it is important to be open minded at first. As you age you can be as bitter and grizzled and cantankerous as you want but you must first be open to actually having the expirences necessary to get old, bitter, cranky.....
 

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it is important to be open minded at first. As you age you can be as bitter and grizzled and cantankerous as you want but you must first be open to actually having the expirences necessary to get old, bitter, cranky.....
 

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If you skulk around Craigslist a bit you'll see that most of the $1000 bikes need a little work. If you pay for style, you'll lack substance and have a project, not a bike. If you're game for that, fall is a good time and you can spend the winter wrenching in the garage. Your budget should include riding gear and the initial tuneup you'll almost certainly desire. If nothing else, that first oil change helps get you familiar with the machine.

I'll third the recommendation for a GS500 (90's vintage) as it's most like the SRX (not too modern in style), dead simple mechanically, easy to re-style and often found for a low cost. You'll have to stiffen the forks for your weight, and that's it. There are a few other similar bikes, but all of them have a better following and the prices tend to be higher.

Good things come to those who wait. Hang on to that savings and the right bike will come along and you will still have many, many sunsets to ride off into...
 

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If you skulk around Craigslist a bit you'll see that most of the $1000 bikes need a little work. If you pay for style, you'll lack substance and have a project, not a bike. If you're game for that, fall is a good time and you can spend the winter wrenching in the garage. Your budget should include riding gear and the initial tuneup you'll almost certainly desire. If nothing else, that first oil change helps get you familiar with the machine.

I'll third the recommendation for a GS500 (90's vintage) as it's most like the SRX (not too modern in style), dead simple mechanically, easy to re-style and often found for a low cost. You'll have to stiffen the forks for your weight, and that's it. There are a few other similar bikes, but all of them have a better following and the prices tend to be higher.

Good things come to those who wait. Hang on to that savings and the right bike will come along and you will still have many, many sunsets to ride off into...
 

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new out the box ninja 250's are 4K. if you have a 650 credit score, go buy one. you can sell it in a year when you out grow it and probably break even.

thanks for filling out your bio.

tex
 

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new out the box ninja 250's are 4K. if you have a 650 credit score, go buy one. you can sell it in a year when you out grow it and probably break even.

thanks for filling out your bio.

tex
 

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Keep in mind that as a new rider you will drop the bike at some stage. Not necessarily "crash" it, but you will forget to put the stand down......park it the wrong way on a hill (in neutral).....have your friends sit on it whilst drunk and fall over.....or any other newbie mistake. Everyone has dropped their first bike. It's a right of passage.

With that in mind, don't expect to buy your pristine dream bike and have it stay that way for long. I would suggest something like a second hand GS500 which is reliable and won't damage too badly if it falls over. Then, when you've got a few miles notched up and can confidently ride, get yourself the bike you REALLY want.

Good luck with it ;)
 

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Keep in mind that as a new rider you will drop the bike at some stage. Not necessarily "crash" it, but you will forget to put the stand down......park it the wrong way on a hill (in neutral).....have your friends sit on it whilst drunk and fall over.....or any other newbie mistake. Everyone has dropped their first bike. It's a right of passage.

With that in mind, don't expect to buy your pristine dream bike and have it stay that way for long. I would suggest something like a second hand GS500 which is reliable and won't damage too badly if it falls over. Then, when you've got a few miles notched up and can confidently ride, get yourself the bike you REALLY want.

Good luck with it ;)
 

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I am so glad that I found this thread. watusippin asked the pretty much the same question I wanted to, and the replies gave me most of the information I was looking for. I have already joined this forum and I am looking forward to learning more from u guys.

I did wanna ask one more thing.

Does anyone know if there is an online encyclopedia for general motorcycle knowledge?

I've been browsing the how stuff works motorcycle page ( http://auto.howstuffworks.com/motorcycles-choppers-channel.htm ) and have learned a lot already, but I was just wondering if there was something else that people "in the know" use.
 
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