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Discussion Starter #1
Hi, I just found this site from a link attached to story forward by the vintage club I'm in. I'm in the Portland, Oregon area. I've checked a few threads but haven't yet found if there are any Yamaha 2-stroke fans here...I'm one.

I don't see how pics can be attached here, but I have a Cafe Racer I've been building for the last few years, based on a '74 RD350. Still needing a couple of things to be totally roadworthy, but almost there.

If someone can tell me how to do so, I'd like to share it if anyone's interested. I'm actually taking a break from work in the garage. I don't have any proper machine tools so any suggestions on what best to use to cut 1/4" think billet aluminum would be greatly appreciated!

I'm trying to make a replacement instrument bracket, since I've just acquired a billet top triple. The original stock RD unit AND the RZ unit I had on (bike has '85 RZ350 KR forks) have attachment holes built in to the front.
 

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Hy Judy, welcome. I am a fan of 2 stroke bikes myself, I just love them.
I wish I could see the pixes. I found out I could not post pixes directly from my PC, so I opened an account with cardomain, and then I can post my pictures directly from that Car Domain account.

If I can help, send me the pictures and I will post them here through my Car Domain acct.

Cant wait to see the pixes, 2 stroke bikes are 100% fun

Cafe racer DOHC CB750F

http://cardomain.com/id/jaimesix
 

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frank c held the lap record at daytona back n the day on his yammie 2 stroke and builds some hot bikes. there are yam 2 smokers here. just dont let jb make you think there arent. you can use a coping saw to cut through that aluminum. avail at homedepot and lowes. it'll take some practice and patience, but it can be done. if you have a router you can use a carbide tipped router bit to cut it too. pretty common these days but most people dont have things like routers.

i use geocities/yahoo. no ads, just straight upload the files, then see the files. they also offer hosting for cheap money and then you can ftp entire folders.

jc
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Ok here's a couple. The bike was conceived as a tribute to my favorite rock group of the 70's, Blue Oyster Cult, back in '77 but I didn't start on it 'til about 2001. All the tricks of the era, and then some. Better late than never...




Edited by - Quicklimegirl on Dec 10 2006 05:45:30 AM
 

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Oh Yeah. That's sweet. Can't help but picturing Will Farrell climbing on it after the studio sesh...
But really it is sweet. I wish I still had mine.

Coping saw for 1/4 inch Billet. You'll get plenty of practice, buy some extra blades and a suitable file.
I'd check with the local machine shop first, if they can do it for less than $40-50 bucks I'd let 'em. Time is money and all that....


FR
 

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its not easy, adn if you can have it machined, its the way to go. ive sawed it with a coping saw before. it does work. but it doesnt make real nice straight cuts unless you practice. you definitely need to file and make pretty afterwards.

jc
 

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super nice bike, i'd be proud to have one like it in my garage.

some people are like slinkies, basically useless but they still make me smile when i push them down the stairs
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for the kind words and advice about the cutting. I do know a sympathetic machinist, but he's busy right now. I bought a coping saw, and wow it takes a lot of effort. I just don't have the energy right now...I was sick most of the week. I friend of mine who's a framing contractor might be able to borrow some type of saw he said had a counter-rotating blade that's supposed to cut through steel. He told me although aluminum is softer it tends to dull blades.

The fairing is a Don Vesco "Cafe Royale" set. I found a duplicate on eBay that is stored upstairs in case something happens. What I can't find is another set of expansion chambers like those, J&R. I've been searching for 10 years! I love the power characteristics, their look and the fact you are able to retain the center & sidestands w/o alteration. I would pay a PREMIUM finders fee for anyone who can find me another set. I want to put them on my stock RD350 -- orange '75 in the background on the street.
It's bone stock except for '03 Z1000 handlebars, Koni shocks and an Arlen Ness (of all things) 19" Cafe HD fiberglass fender.

I've been "in love" with Yamaha twins since obtaining my first, a '73 RD350 in early '77; I now have the Cafe bike, the '75 stocker, a '75 RD60 (see pic of my BF playing around on it!) which has a pretty cool factory Cafe look...a stock '75 RD125, and an '85 RZ350 Kenny Roberts Special. I had a '79 RD400F which is still in the garage, I gave it to Kevin for his Birthday. We will be starting on getting it back running later this winter.

For long trips my modern bike is a '03 Z1000. Except for the heat, it was fantastic riding it to USGP in Monterey last summer.






Edited by - Quicklimegirl on Dec 10 2006 7:26:48 PM
 

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1/4" billet? Have a jig saw? If not borrow one from a friend, a good one, buy a bunch of metal blades clamp 'er down and have at it. You'd be suprised at how well those little suckers can cut. Full gear though, shit is loud as hell and those little red-hot peices of alu. don't feel so good in the eyes.

I chopped up a NYC parking sign for my tach bracket. It's recycling!

BORN TO LURK, FORCED TO WORK.
www.NYCvinMoto.com
www.VinMoto.org
 

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I have a nice Bosch Jig Saw that works wonders on 1/4 aluminum....with the proper blade...and use some WD40 to keep the aluminum for sticking to the teeth.
JohnnyB
 

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theyre right, and bosch makes the best saw. if you want to rough something itd probably work good, then plenty of hand filing and working. if you need to get inside of something small, i was recommending the coping saw. they make different blades for them. for cutting through all kinds of materials. you could make a template from 1/4" plywood, and use a router too. but thats going to cost you more them having a machinist do it. hey jb, hw about your favorite place, emachine.com?

jc
 

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emachineshop would do it....if you made up a drawing using their software....problem is a one off item would probably cost about $300. Whereas ten of them would probably be $340....weird that way that works :)
JohnnyB
 

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billet, right? Camelhairy, help these guys out. Tell em what billet is AGAIN.
 

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I don't think you need 1/4" plate for a gauge bracket - I just built one out of .065 aluminum scrap. As long as it's relatively small you should be able to get away with the thin stuff and a hacksaw.
 

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Yeah I usually use 1/16" if it's got enough support...1/8" if it's iffy.
1/4" thick and you could stand on your gauges.

I have had a couple of 1/16" tach mounts crack on the race bike after a couple of seasons. Would probably be fine for the street though.
JohnnyB
 

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Discussion Starter #18
quote:
I don't think you need 1/4" plate for a gauge bracket - I just built one out of .065 aluminum scrap. As long as it's relatively small you should be able to get away with the thin stuff and a hacksaw.
The problem is I can't get off work in time to make it to this place called "The metal store" and so I have to take what I can find from a local old style hardware store that picks up odd pieces. You never know what's available...I would've loved to use 1/8" had it been available.

I appreciate all the ideas and help offered. I'll try to fight through this myself somehow, because I have to save my $$$ for the final pieces I need...making new fairing mount brackets, and designing a replacement rear caliper bracket. The one on the bike is for an old RD400 caliper (big overbuilt blue one in the picture). It has the wrong axle diameter since the RZ wheel has a smaller axle; I cannot use the RZ unit because of the dual rear shocks. So I'm going to chuck the old one and start from scratch. I'll probably stay with the period (RD) caliper for a couple of reasons:
1) The spirit of this bike was to stay with the era as much as possible;
2) I have SS pucks and rebuild kits for the RD units

I figure if the machinist I know isn't busy at the time and is still sympathetic to my cause, I can perhaps talk him into making the caliper bracket for about $250 or so. The fairing brackets will be straightforward, replacements for the crudely cut out existing ones which don't provide proper seating of the mounts.

As soon as I can get this bracket done I'll be disassembling the rear end and taking the fairing off to work on those. I hope I can get all of it done by March, since we want to start resurrecting the '79 RD400F Daytona Special which has been sitting idle for about a dozen years. It's the only bike left in the garage that isn't running yet.

Edited by - Quicklimegirl on Dec 11 2006 4:32:31 PM
 

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You can order just about any kind and any size of metal you want from McMaster Carr....delievered right to your door.
JohnnyB
 

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PM me your address and I'll send you a piece of 2" wide by .065 by the length of an envelope.

Oh, and can you flip the RZ caliper bracket around to the bottom of the axle? You might have to unhook it to bleed the rear brakes but that shouldn't be a problem.





Edited by - robertob on Dec 11 2006 5:11:48 PM
 
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