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Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys. So I posted a reply in a thread about myself and was told it would be easier to start my own thread. I didn't at first because I wasn't sure how but I got it now. So I'm new to the bike world and I needed some brutal advice (which I already got so keep it coming) I'm four feet eleven inches and I'm about 90 pounds. What's a good beginner bike to learn to ride AND build? I have been looking at some Honda cb's and some Suzuki ts185 and a few others. I'm not sure is a Honda cb350 is too big or a 100-200 is too small? Anything advice is greatly appreciated!
 

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At five foot you are about the size of the Japanese guys who designed and manufactured the motorcycles you are most likely interested in buying. So most Jap bikes will suit you.

"What's a good beginner bike to learn to ride AND build?". Your first bike is for learning to survive in traffic, learning to ride and learning maintain a cheap motorcycle. The " build " comes later, and probably the second or third bike.

Go book an MSF type course. Dreamings great, but go take some concrete steps.

Danger, is my business."
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Yea that's what I figured about the height. It's a good slap in the face reality to hear that too. I gotta take a step back and learn first before I build. I still want a cheap little bike that might need some restoring but nothing too crazy. Is that out of the question too? Or should I buy a cheap all out together one ?
 

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Forget restoring your first bike. You need a runner, a first starter, with a valid title.

Unless you plan on pushing a GoldWing down a muddy road, your size is not really an issue: riding skills are.

Gaston Rahier was about four foot nothing and probably was the fastest Dakar rider of his generation.

gaston10.jpg

Danger, is my business."
 

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Fuck the idea of "learning" and "building" at the same time.

Buy a clean modern 250 and learn to ride and maintain a bike.
Then buy a lawn mower to learn how to take something apart and put it back together.
After that MAYBE think about a project/
 

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Used Honda 250 or EX500. Or any of the new 300s (Ninja, CBR, R3). Take an MSF class! Save up for full gear (full face helmet, jacket, pants or slider jeans, gloves and boots)!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thank you man I really appreciate it. Something I needed to hear. From all of you guys so thanks. I will be back with most posts and questions!
 

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I would suggest a Honda Rebel. With your frame it might suit you perfect. Then you can work on it and learn maintanence then........when you get that cafe bike wild hair up your ass then you can turn it into this....


image.jpg
 

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I was going to also suggest the rebel 250. There are tons of them out there in good shape and they don't sell for a whole lot of money. They are Honda's so they last damn near forever.

In the same vein, but bigger/faster, is the Kawasaki 454LTD and Vulcan 500. Both cruisers, so they have a very low seat height, but otherwise they are based on the Ninja 500/EX500 so you can get the feel for what a real motorcycle does. Not sure how much work this would need 1989 Kawasaki 454 LTD
Here's one that is currently a daily rider, if you believe the guy who wrote the ad Vulcan 500
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thank you so much! I was looking at a few rebels too but they were kinda far away from me. I was also looking at a few Vulcans but I was afraid they were to big for me since I'm really new.
 

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Biggest thing to keep in mind when learning to ride a motorcycle.

No matter how big or small, it's only going to go as fast as you twist your right wrist. Your motorcycle will not control you. You will control your motorcycle. That you can be assured of.

If you are prone to panic reaction driving a car, you will also on a motorcycle. It's the fear of the unknown that is part of the art of riding, embrace it and it becomes second nature. Fear it and your likelihood of becoming a hood ornament rises exponentially.

One thing I'd like to touch on is the desire to be able to sit flat footed from the saddle. You have more muscle control at a stop from the balls of your feet (1 will do nicely) than flat footed. It changes the used muscle group from your quadraceps (locomotive power and hip control) to your calf muscules (gastrocnemius and soleus) which through the Achilles tendon and your feet provide a bit of springiness (suspension) while sitting.

Just something to chew on.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Now thats a valuable piece of information. I'm not a nervous person in the car. When I first got my license all I did was drive aorund because I loved driving ever since I was a little kid, go karts, etc. So I'm not worried about riding a bike, I just need to learn how. But thats a good start. So you're saying it'll be easier if I;m not completely flat footed from sitting on the seat? Rather have one foot on the ball?
 

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1, 2 or 4...

I once sold a Triumph Tbird 900 to a very vertically challenged man, who nearly hung off the saddle on the opposing thigh to stay upright while stopped. The guy was thrilled with the bike. That's a bit extreme, but the truth.

I recommend just finding a bike that you're comfortable on, no matter whether it be small or monstrously large.
 
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