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someone told me on the wera board that they read in rrworld that fuels like VP U4 are banned this year from competition. i haven't renewed my membership, so i'm out of the loop. what's the scoop, poop?

texy
 

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Yea they announced it at the LRRS banquet that we wouldn't be able to use anything except the gas they sell at the track and the gas at the station down the street. 2-strokes are exempt. Not sure how they plan to regulate it, but there it is.
We ran pump gas in the R6 last year anyway, so it's not that big a deal for us. But, I do think people will cheat, and I do not know how they plan to regulate it. I predict a lot of, "oh, i'm just holding it for my 2-stroke buddy".

Z



Edited by - paced_haste on Feb 05 2007 7:30:59 PM
 

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Yea they announced it at the LRRS banquet that we wouldn't be able to use anything except the gas they sell at the track and the gas at the station down the street. 2-strokes are exempt. Not sure how they plan to regulate it, but there it is.
We ran pump gas in the R6 last year anyway, so it's not that big a deal for us. But, I do think people will cheat, and I do not know how they plan to regulate it. I predict a lot of, "oh, i'm just holding it for my 2-stroke buddy".

Z



Edited by - paced_haste on Feb 05 2007 7:30:59 PM
 

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they can dye it. no dye, illegal.

like they do with deisel.

jc
 

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they can dye it. no dye, illegal.

like they do with deisel.

jc
 

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they dye deisel, or dont, i can never remember, so that truckers dont use #2 home heating oil. its like half the cost, but the same thing. the red dye in it is so that it can be checked at weigh stations and inspections stations. im pretty sure its a huge fine if youre caught running with it. (i knew a guy who used to do it. he owned a home heating fuel company and dumped it into his tour boats) i dont see why they couldnt do the same thing. also, id bet the specific gravity is different. so they could easily check that i think.

jc
 

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they dye deisel, or dont, i can never remember, so that truckers dont use #2 home heating oil. its like half the cost, but the same thing. the red dye in it is so that it can be checked at weigh stations and inspections stations. im pretty sure its a huge fine if youre caught running with it. (i knew a guy who used to do it. he owned a home heating fuel company and dumped it into his tour boats) i dont see why they couldnt do the same thing. also, id bet the specific gravity is different. so they could easily check that i think.

jc
 

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wow. from the chevron site.

DIESEL FUEL DYEING
A confusing situation for both refiners and purchasers of diesel fuel has arisen because both the IRS and the EPA require the addition of red dye to certain classes of diesel fuel. However, each agency requires that the dye be added to a different class of fuel, at a different concentration, and for a different reason.

The EPA wants to identify diesel fuel with a high sulfur content in order to ensure that it is not used in on-road vehicles.
The IRS wants to ensure that tax-exempt low sulfur and high sulfur diesel fuel are not used for taxable purposes.

The EPA Requirements Originally, the EPA's low sulfur diesel regulations required the addition of blue dye to noncomplying high sulfur (>0.05% mass) fuels. But after the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) expressed concerns that blue-dyed diesel fuel might be confused with the most common aviation gasoline, which already was being dyed blue, the EPA changed the dye from blue to red.

The EPA regulations require "visible evidence of the presence of red dye" to identify high sulfur fuels intended for off-road use. In practice, this requires refiners to add a level of red dye that is equivalent to no more than 0.75 pounds/1000 bbl (ptb) of a solid Solvent Red 26 dye standard. Solvent Red 26 was chosen as the standard because it is a unique chemical available in pure form. Diesel fuels are actually dyed with liquid concentrates of Solvent Red 164 because this dye is more fuel soluble and less costly than the standard. Solvent Red 164 is a mixture of isomers that are very similar to Solvent Red 26, except the former incorporates hydrocarbon (alkyl) chains to increase its solubility in petroleum products.

Any red dye observed in the fuel of a vehicle in on-road use triggers a measurement of the fuel's sulfur content. Penalties are assessed based on the actual sulfur content of the fuel, rather than simply on the presence of dye.

The IRS Requirements The IRS regulations require that tax-exempt diesel fuels, both high sulfur and low sulfur, have a minimum level of a Solvent Red 164 dye that is spectrally equivalent to 3.9 ptb of Solvent Red 26 dye standard. This level of dye is more than five times the amount required by the EPA regulations. The IRS contends that the high dye level is necessary to allow detection of tax evasion even after five-fold dilution of dyed fuel with undyed fuel.
 

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wow. from the chevron site.

DIESEL FUEL DYEING
A confusing situation for both refiners and purchasers of diesel fuel has arisen because both the IRS and the EPA require the addition of red dye to certain classes of diesel fuel. However, each agency requires that the dye be added to a different class of fuel, at a different concentration, and for a different reason.

The EPA wants to identify diesel fuel with a high sulfur content in order to ensure that it is not used in on-road vehicles.
The IRS wants to ensure that tax-exempt low sulfur and high sulfur diesel fuel are not used for taxable purposes.

The EPA Requirements Originally, the EPA's low sulfur diesel regulations required the addition of blue dye to noncomplying high sulfur (>0.05% mass) fuels. But after the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) expressed concerns that blue-dyed diesel fuel might be confused with the most common aviation gasoline, which already was being dyed blue, the EPA changed the dye from blue to red.

The EPA regulations require "visible evidence of the presence of red dye" to identify high sulfur fuels intended for off-road use. In practice, this requires refiners to add a level of red dye that is equivalent to no more than 0.75 pounds/1000 bbl (ptb) of a solid Solvent Red 26 dye standard. Solvent Red 26 was chosen as the standard because it is a unique chemical available in pure form. Diesel fuels are actually dyed with liquid concentrates of Solvent Red 164 because this dye is more fuel soluble and less costly than the standard. Solvent Red 164 is a mixture of isomers that are very similar to Solvent Red 26, except the former incorporates hydrocarbon (alkyl) chains to increase its solubility in petroleum products.

Any red dye observed in the fuel of a vehicle in on-road use triggers a measurement of the fuel's sulfur content. Penalties are assessed based on the actual sulfur content of the fuel, rather than simply on the presence of dye.

The IRS Requirements The IRS regulations require that tax-exempt diesel fuels, both high sulfur and low sulfur, have a minimum level of a Solvent Red 164 dye that is spectrally equivalent to 3.9 ptb of Solvent Red 26 dye standard. This level of dye is more than five times the amount required by the EPA regulations. The IRS contends that the high dye level is necessary to allow detection of tax evasion even after five-fold dilution of dyed fuel with undyed fuel.
 

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I know the heavily dyed stuff messes up my kerosene heater after a few tank fulls.
Locally when I get kerosene...some of it is dyed, some of it not. The Kerosene they deliver to my house is clear, the fuel oil to my house is not dyed...so who the hell knows.
And yeah I've heard there are some big fines for using the wrong stuff.
JohnnyB
 

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I know the heavily dyed stuff messes up my kerosene heater after a few tank fulls.
Locally when I get kerosene...some of it is dyed, some of it not. The Kerosene they deliver to my house is clear, the fuel oil to my house is not dyed...so who the hell knows.
And yeah I've heard there are some big fines for using the wrong stuff.
JohnnyB
 

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if you get caught with it on your boat its real big. the state police here check truckers tanks for it.

jc
 

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if you get caught with it on your boat its real big. the state police here check truckers tanks for it.

jc
 

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does the irs give tax exempt status for my #2 stroke, red dyed, taco. what about bio fuel? does french fry oil require a 25:1 ratio? i think the checkered flag restaurant can supply FF oil at the track...does that count? too many questions.
parks
 
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