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Thought I would post quick thread to help out those looking to remove rust from hard to reach places without having to replace parts. I used wood bleach (oxalic acid) that you can find at your local paint store and dipped the tricky rusty parts in it over night. Here is a photo of the rear shocks after one was dipped and the other still on the bike. This bike sat in a lean to type shed since 1989 and oxalic acid did its trick!!! I will be happy to answer any questions.
Oxolic Acid Test.jpg
 

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It is easy to handle but has some servere warnings on back of container like dont eat or breath in or let kids play with it and stuff! It is acid but comes in powder form and is fairly easy to handle. I purchased a 12 ounce container and use one maybe two for a large metal 5 gallon container I would place parts in. I still have tons of it left and dipped most everything I could on the bike and it only cost about 8 bucks plus the water you use! It does need to set over night so you want to have it in a secure area where pets kids and wives cant get to it and spill/drink it.
 

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I am using White Vinegar on some rusty things now. Have tried Evaporust and it did well. The amount of rust that the Vinegar has pulled up is impressive. No one is going to eat/drink Straight Vinegar. Besides, thats the medium with which the local barbecue is seasoned. It makes me feel like going out and getting a plate.

If this turns out to be a bust then I'll have to try your Oxalic Acid trick.
 

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That's cool, it did a great job! It doesn't damage the seals? The rubber bushing looks ok in the photo. I've just brought my XS650 project back from the dead after sitting untouched for about 6 years. I had lots of rusty parts when I started. Curiously, they haven't derusted themselves in all that time. Wonder how that would work on rusty spokes? Might have to see. :confused:
 

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if its (COOH)[SUB]2[/SUB], its organic acid present in many plants and food - like rhubarb. Thus I don't think disposing is much of an environmental hazard. Strong acid but organic in nature.
 

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well I just read a good discussion on the topic and safety.

about the acids -here is an answer to whether oxalic acid is good for rust removal from old tools for example: (google translated as discussion was in Finnish)
"Easier removal of rustygear is citric acid, and it is also less expensive.Oxalic acid makes the surface build up with oxalates, citric acid creates citralates, and the latter is easier to remove. Phosphoric acid is popular because of the surface build up consist of phosphates which in itself prevent rusting."

Thus budget cola is also used for rust removal. I believe evaporust is phosporic acid mostly.
 

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well I just read a good discussion on the topic and safety.

about the acids -here is an answer to whether oxalic acid is good for rust removal from old tools for example: (google translated as discussion was in Finnish)
"Easier removal of rustygear is citric acid, and it is also less expensive.Oxalic acid makes the surface build up with oxalates, citric acid creates citralates, and the latter is easier to remove. Phosphoric acid is popular because of the surface build up consist of phosphates which in itself prevent rusting."

Thus budget cola is also used for rust removal. I believe evaporust is phosporic acid mostly.
So how are the post treatment surface buildups removed ?
ed
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I use microfiber to clean up. Adds a little polish to the parts and makes clean up very easy. There are no problems with any of the other parts that are non-metallic either since the acid is diluted.
 
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