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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys,

this may not be the appropriate forum to put this up on but I thought I'd give it a shot. I finished my 78 CB750 cafe and I'm looking for a new project. I stumbled across a guy in my neighborhood unleading a 75 supersport for tiny change. I've been thinking about putting together a bobber and wondered if anyone's built one out there. I usually see the Triumph's as bobbers but not the 750's. Any thoughts out there?
Thanks
Jay
 

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First of all...a cb750 cannot be a true bobber because it was built after real "bobbers" were obsolete. Strictly speaking a real bobber is any bike that served the dual purpose life as a daily rider and a racebike (most likely a dirt track bike). A bobber is a functional bike first not a styling exercise. Bobbers faded out of popularity in the early 1960s when dedicated racebikes became the standard. To call those cut down hardtailed style contraptions bobbers is to join the ranks of the label making ignorant hipster assholes who need to fake a connection to the past. Furthermore if you look at the type of bike that is called a "bobber" today you will find that it is actually more like an early chopper than a bobber. Early choppers were style oreintated bikes, most of them lowered and stripped down.

That being said there areplenty of guys who build hardtailed and nonhardtailed stripped and lowered cb750s. Proteal's bike is a good example of a unique lowered stripped down look you can get out of a cb750 without any major fabrication.

Supersports are a nice bike to mod because you can move the foot controls easier due to the rear disc brake. If you really want to hardtail it there are vendors that sell a weld on hardtail.

cycle-exchange sells a frame they call the "super bobber". It is a nice conservative hardtail frame and will take most if not all your stock honda parts. It will probably be about 1/2 the cost of a harley frame but it will not be cheap.

One thing to think about is if you are building a bike to look period or vintage, look at some of the styling things that might help add to that look. Most pre 1950s bikes are devoid of a lot of chrome. painted rims, painted spokes, painted or bare metal exhaust, these things add up in the looks dept. Also things like gaiters and stamped metal parts (fork ears, tool boxes, etc...) help establish the looks, as do headlights with speedos in the back and funky curved bar bends like superbike bars, daytona bars, beach bars, etc...have. Finally, the jet age (late 1950s - late 1960s) was all sleekness and hard edges, where as the 30's and 40's with more of an art deco aero-streamlined period with lots of round shapes.

here are some links to get you started.

www.hondachopper.com
www.sohc4.net
www.cyclexchange.net
 

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also adding to the Idea for a hardtail 750 are just hard tail kits that you weld on to your frame they give you loose unwelded prebent but un cut tubing and wheel mount plate .To me it sthe way to go an dits under 300 bucks.Any frame you but maybe out of sight for the back yard /home project as the whole idea is to keep cost down.
I agree with the idea everyone equates a hard tail bike with a tractor seat as being a "Bobber".They are also plenty of tractor style seats on ebay too.So good luck...
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Geeto & Lil Bull,

thanks for the great information. I was mostly considering this bike for the fact that the guy only wants $200 for it. I think i'll just buy it for a parts bike and the tank, my 78 tank looks a bit rediculous in my opinion. Again thanks for the info!

~ Jay
 
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