Cafe Racer Forum banner

1 - 20 of 82 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
whats up everybody?! i'm new to this here forum. and figured i'd introduce myself. i'm slowly transforming my 1976 cb750 into a lean, mean, cafe racer. so far just put my clubmans on it...gotta love the look of those. i found a pretty beat up seat that i must recover on ebay. and i'm planning on working the whole bike over in the winter months. i'll have pics up soon so you guys can see my transformation. i'm getting a lot of good style ideas from carpy (cb750cafe.com). but not trying to bite his style completely. but if anyone is in the philadelphia region on here hit me up and come out for a ride sometime!

cheers!
chello.!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
68 Posts
I may not have many posts, but i have lurked here long enough to know that this is hilarious. I call foul, chello is intentionally baiting.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
68 Posts
I may not have many posts, but i have lurked here long enough to know that this is hilarious. I call foul, chello is intentionally baiting.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,303 Posts
smells like bait.....maybe he is masturbating, you know, to pictures of dudes. Clubman installation on a cb750 has that effect you know....

chello, let me give you some advice...there is a seach tool on this forum. Look up clubmans, carpy, knee dents, and just for fun lemming. After the seizures stop, you are welcome to come back so we can guide you in building a well put together bike, not a throw and go bucket of bolts.

Let me give you some sage advice about your bike:

- clubmans....yeah, I understand they were a cheap way to get your cafe fix but unless you removed your gauges or changed your master cylinder (or god forbid spent more than 15 bucks on a decent pair of adjustables) you probably have some pretty funky angles going on there. With the stock pegs, unless you are 5'10" or shorter, you are probably putting a lot of weight on your wrists which is no good. And I don't even want to know what you did with the internal wiring. Take a step back and really look at your bike for a second and ask youself "does this look clean?" followed by "does this feel like a useful bike to ride?" which leads me to my second point....

- Planning. I know your sperm sack is just brimming with spooge that you can't wait to expel jacking off to ugly fashon racers, and the clubmans probably got you a giddy little thrill that makes you feel like you are part of that image but you need to take a step back, calm down, and plan your project. Right know your bike is probably a torture rack to ride and you may not even know it. I don't know if you have ever ridden a modern sport bike, but if you have, hopefully one one of the things you took away from the expirence is that despite the racer position they are fairly comfortable (espically the japanese bikes). Your spine isn't arched up or compressed from your pelvis being at an unnatural angle just so your feet are on the pegs, your wrists don't hurt after 10 minutes, these are things that indicate a properly setup bike for the rider and are easily acheieved on your cb750 with proper planning.

you need to think what the whole bike is about. A bike is always the sum of its parts and if you don't pick parts that work together then your bike will be junk. A true cafe racer is a study in minimalism, funactionality, and performance for the street (just as a race bike is a study in those things for the track). Everything on your bike should have a function, not just a form. If your clubmans make your bike less comfortable to ride, then you have failed, no matter how much they give you "the look". Figure out all the parts you want to have on paper before you turn one wrench and you will actually get your bike done and done right.

some things you will realize need to be changed all at once, others you can do piecemeal:
-Any time you make a significant change to your riding position with one part, you have to change other parts to compensate. Example - you want low bars? change the foot controls as well to accomidate a more forward riding positon. Your seat will probably make a big impact too on riding position but usually you can adjust some things to work with seat height differences.

- Bodywork, specifically tank and seat, should be done at the same time to insure a clean fit that doesn't look cobbled together.

- the best place to start building a cafe racer is in the mechanicals. The bike needs to be 1) reliable, and 2) tuned. Started with a basic tuneup - plugs, timing etc...if you need points, consider changing over to electronic ignition, if you need an airfilter consider a K&N for inside the box (so help me if you put pods on your bike just for the look I will come through the screen, stop a mudhole in your ass, and then walk it dry). make sure all the electricals work and fix anything that doesn't work (even if you know you will trash it later - signals come to mind).

well, the only thing I can say is don't be afraid to ask questions here. we're a motley bunch but we mean well. Make sure you do a search too since a lot of the common questions have been asked a million times.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,303 Posts
smells like bait.....maybe he is masturbating, you know, to pictures of dudes. Clubman installation on a cb750 has that effect you know....

chello, let me give you some advice...there is a seach tool on this forum. Look up clubmans, carpy, knee dents, and just for fun lemming. After the seizures stop, you are welcome to come back so we can guide you in building a well put together bike, not a throw and go bucket of bolts.

Let me give you some sage advice about your bike:

- clubmans....yeah, I understand they were a cheap way to get your cafe fix but unless you removed your gauges or changed your master cylinder (or god forbid spent more than 15 bucks on a decent pair of adjustables) you probably have some pretty funky angles going on there. With the stock pegs, unless you are 5'10" or shorter, you are probably putting a lot of weight on your wrists which is no good. And I don't even want to know what you did with the internal wiring. Take a step back and really look at your bike for a second and ask youself "does this look clean?" followed by "does this feel like a useful bike to ride?" which leads me to my second point....

- Planning. I know your sperm sack is just brimming with spooge that you can't wait to expel jacking off to ugly fashon racers, and the clubmans probably got you a giddy little thrill that makes you feel like you are part of that image but you need to take a step back, calm down, and plan your project. Right know your bike is probably a torture rack to ride and you may not even know it. I don't know if you have ever ridden a modern sport bike, but if you have, hopefully one one of the things you took away from the expirence is that despite the racer position they are fairly comfortable (espically the japanese bikes). Your spine isn't arched up or compressed from your pelvis being at an unnatural angle just so your feet are on the pegs, your wrists don't hurt after 10 minutes, these are things that indicate a properly setup bike for the rider and are easily acheieved on your cb750 with proper planning.

you need to think what the whole bike is about. A bike is always the sum of its parts and if you don't pick parts that work together then your bike will be junk. A true cafe racer is a study in minimalism, funactionality, and performance for the street (just as a race bike is a study in those things for the track). Everything on your bike should have a function, not just a form. If your clubmans make your bike less comfortable to ride, then you have failed, no matter how much they give you "the look". Figure out all the parts you want to have on paper before you turn one wrench and you will actually get your bike done and done right.

some things you will realize need to be changed all at once, others you can do piecemeal:
-Any time you make a significant change to your riding position with one part, you have to change other parts to compensate. Example - you want low bars? change the foot controls as well to accomidate a more forward riding positon. Your seat will probably make a big impact too on riding position but usually you can adjust some things to work with seat height differences.

- Bodywork, specifically tank and seat, should be done at the same time to insure a clean fit that doesn't look cobbled together.

- the best place to start building a cafe racer is in the mechanicals. The bike needs to be 1) reliable, and 2) tuned. Started with a basic tuneup - plugs, timing etc...if you need points, consider changing over to electronic ignition, if you need an airfilter consider a K&N for inside the box (so help me if you put pods on your bike just for the look I will come through the screen, stop a mudhole in your ass, and then walk it dry). make sure all the electricals work and fix anything that doesn't work (even if you know you will trash it later - signals come to mind).

well, the only thing I can say is don't be afraid to ask questions here. we're a motley bunch but we mean well. Make sure you do a search too since a lot of the common questions have been asked a million times.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,782 Posts
Geeto,
Why did you rise to the bait?
This has got to be a setup, but looking at his bio, maybe not. He is going to build a lean, mean cafe racer and he already has the clubmans to start.

Ken
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,782 Posts
Geeto,
Why did you rise to the bait?
This has got to be a setup, but looking at his bio, maybe not. He is going to build a lean, mean cafe racer and he already has the clubmans to start.

Ken
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
546 Posts
Geeto you need a newbie stamp that you can stamp on ur tank for each of ur many newbie kills. Kinda WWII fighter pilot esque. So whos good with rubber molding? haha
 
1 - 20 of 82 Posts
Top