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Yeah. Every new piston you throw in an engine should be cleaned up beforehand. That doesn't mean modify. It means make it right.

Besides, modern RZ or Banshee pistons already have some pretty big ports in the pistons. No need to make them bigger. Just weakens the piston.
 

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Discussion Starter #22
The banshee Pistons have an angry inch dangling there below the intake ports which needs to be removed for them to fit in an aircooled RD. I had already done this and dressed the pistons before I realized I ordered the wrong size. My last set were 1.00mm over. I needed 1.50mm over, and I ordered 0.50 over. So now I have a perfect set of first over performance pistons. I'll save them and eventually I'll stuff them in a fresh set of cylinders.

peace and grease, and HAPPY TURKEYWEEN,
-fang
 

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Discussion Starter #23
Since my last post all my parts have arrived, including the correct pistons and the transistorized ignition booster (which arrived this afternoon). I should be able to pick up my cylinders and pistons from the machinist either Monday or Tuesday, and I spent a few hours this evening wiring up all my happy ignition system mods.

I just finished installing a pair of car coils, the ignition booster, and several different resistors so I can experiment to see what will yield the max performance while not overloading my charging system.

First of all I want to say that the transistorized ignition booster thingy is a beautiful item. Sometimes when you get a one-off, hand made item you are immediately disappointed in its quality. Not so today. Mark Paris, AKA 'HondaMan' delivered a completely professional looking and feeling package. It was wrapped up well, it included a set of Japanese OEM-style bullet connectors for wiring, extra resistors, and a three page instruction manual which had a large easy to read wiring diagram, plus a written 5 year warranty, signed my Mark. Everything was absolutely top-notch. First response is "WOW!"

Lets take a look at it.

Here is the booster immediately after opening.



Another angle.



And here is all the stuff mounted on my bike.



A better picture of the parts on the bike. From left to right: The white rectangular thing is a dual filament Mopar coil ballast resistor. One side measured 1.1ohm, and the other measures 5.1. Right now I am only going to use the 1.1 side with the small resistors Mark provided. Used in conjunction with the 1.1 ohm coils, they should operate like 3 ohm coils. Next you see the little golden 1.0 ohm resistors that Mark included with the the booster. They are mounted to some light aluminum angle iron which is mounted to the booster's red aluminum housing. Then the left side's chrome car coil can be seen. I believe the installation is complete, and I will be experimenting with varying resistance on the coils, and recording the findings by measuring spark gap and hopefully amperage consumption.

Basically, all this crap is present to replace the stock Yamaha coils. The intention is to allow me to use car coils and significantly boost spark output while maintaining the points ignition and to not drain the battery while it is operating.

After the top end is assembled I will be building a seat, then this bike will be close enough to being done that I will be happy for a little while.

peace and grease.
-fang
 

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Discussion Starter #24
Since my last post all my parts have arrived, including the correct pistons and the transistorized ignition booster (which arrived this afternoon). I should be able to pick up my cylinders and pistons from the machinist either Monday or Tuesday, and I spent a few hours this evening wiring up all my happy ignition system mods.

I just finished installing a pair of car coils, the ignition booster, and several different resistors so I can experiment to see what will yield the max performance while not overloading my charging system.

First of all I want to say that the transistorized ignition booster thingy is a beautiful item. Sometimes when you get a one-off, hand made item you are immediately disappointed in its quality. Not so today. Mark Paris, AKA 'HondaMan' delivered a completely professional looking and feeling package. It was wrapped up well, it included a set of Japanese OEM-style bullet connectors for wiring, extra resistors, and a three page instruction manual which had a large easy to read wiring diagram, plus a written 5 year warranty, signed my Mark. Everything was absolutely top-notch. First response is "WOW!"

Lets take a look at it.

Here is the booster immediately after opening.



Another angle.



And here is all the stuff mounted on my bike.



A better picture of the parts on the bike. From left to right: The white rectangular thing is a dual filament Mopar coil ballast resistor. One side measured 1.1ohm, and the other measures 5.1. Right now I am only going to use the 1.1 side with the small resistors Mark provided. Used in conjunction with the 1.1 ohm coils, they should operate like 3 ohm coils. Next you see the little golden 1.0 ohm resistors that Mark included with the the booster. They are mounted to some light aluminum angle iron which is mounted to the booster's red aluminum housing. Then the left side's chrome car coil can be seen. I believe the installation is complete, and I will be experimenting with varying resistance on the coils, and recording the findings by measuring spark gap and hopefully amperage consumption.

Basically, all this crap is present to replace the stock Yamaha coils. The intention is to allow me to use car coils and significantly boost spark output while maintaining the points ignition and to not drain the battery while it is operating.

After the top end is assembled I will be building a seat, then this bike will be close enough to being done that I will be happy for a little while.

peace and grease.
-fang
 

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Interesting setup. If the big gain is to reduce the current through the points, why not just switch over to a Dyna or Newtronics system? There's a guy on the USA2Strokes forum selling a setup that uses the Dyna triggers instead of the points/condenser system for a decent price. I guess I don't understand why you'd want to add all these pieces to keep the mechanical points system.
http://www.usa2strokers.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=33541
I understand wanting something you can swap around in case the electronics fail, but I've heard of many more points failures than Dyna or other system failures.

I've been thinking of adding one of these newer regulator/rectifier units. If I keep my RD400, I'd like to upgrade the headlights, and anything that can improve the current going to the battery would help.
http://www.hvccycle.com/Voltage regrec.htm
 

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Interesting setup. If the big gain is to reduce the current through the points, why not just switch over to a Dyna or Newtronics system? There's a guy on the USA2Strokes forum selling a setup that uses the Dyna triggers instead of the points/condenser system for a decent price. I guess I don't understand why you'd want to add all these pieces to keep the mechanical points system.
http://www.usa2strokers.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=33541
I understand wanting something you can swap around in case the electronics fail, but I've heard of many more points failures than Dyna or other system failures.

I've been thinking of adding one of these newer regulator/rectifier units. If I keep my RD400, I'd like to upgrade the headlights, and anything that can improve the current going to the battery would help.
http://www.hvccycle.com/Voltage regrec.htm
 

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Fang's ignintion only uses the points to trigger his ignition. No big amps go thru them so they won't wear out. The benefit is when on a long ride, or at the track, if his ignition fails (which i doubt it will) you can swap two wires and run the stock points setup like normal.
So Fang has a hot ignition setup that doesn't drain too much, and won't require lots of maintenance.

For coils btw, the stock CB750 coils have a really really good long dwell from what Mark was telling me. They are hard to beat. The Dynas had more volts, but shorter dwell. That long dwell goes long way in topend power. That Mark is a really knowledgable nice dude.
 

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Fang's ignintion only uses the points to trigger his ignition. No big amps go thru them so they won't wear out. The benefit is when on a long ride, or at the track, if his ignition fails (which i doubt it will) you can swap two wires and run the stock points setup like normal.
So Fang has a hot ignition setup that doesn't drain too much, and won't require lots of maintenance.

For coils btw, the stock CB750 coils have a really really good long dwell from what Mark was telling me. They are hard to beat. The Dynas had more volts, but shorter dwell. That long dwell goes long way in topend power. That Mark is a really knowledgable nice dude.
 

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Discussion Starter #29
Unga, that updated rectifier/regulator is on my short list of near future updates. FYI, I am about 90% sure that the HVC unit to which you linked is made by Tony over at Oregon Motorcycle Parts, where it is sold for a little less money. Brad at HVC is a good guy, but I REALLY like Tony at Oregon MP -- old retired hippy electronics guys living out in the mountains, making amazing products from their home always have a soft spot for me. Kudos to him!

Also, like Pampadori said, my system is redundant -- if it fails while I am out and about, I can quickly and easily convert it back to stock operation on the side of the road with no tools. I am not familiar with any Dyna-style electric ignitions that are capable of any performance gains over the one I have assembled, and mine costs around $150-$300 less. But most importantly, mine is authentically retro cool!


EDIT:
HERE is a link to some of Oregon Motorcycle Parts' regulator/rectifiers. The one for the Yamaha 2-stroke twins costs $115, and is called a 'VRREM7-YRD.' It looks the same and has the same part number as the one HVC sells. ;)


peace and grease.
-fang
 

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Discussion Starter #30
Unga, that updated rectifier/regulator is on my short list of near future updates. FYI, I am about 90% sure that the HVC unit to which you linked is made by Tony over at Oregon Motorcycle Parts, where it is sold for a little less money. Brad at HVC is a good guy, but I REALLY like Tony at Oregon MP -- old retired hippy electronics guys living out in the mountains, making amazing products from their home always have a soft spot for me. Kudos to him!

Also, like Pampadori said, my system is redundant -- if it fails while I am out and about, I can quickly and easily convert it back to stock operation on the side of the road with no tools. I am not familiar with any Dyna-style electric ignitions that are capable of any performance gains over the one I have assembled, and mine costs around $150-$300 less. But most importantly, mine is authentically retro cool!


EDIT:
HERE is a link to some of Oregon Motorcycle Parts' regulator/rectifiers. The one for the Yamaha 2-stroke twins costs $115, and is called a 'VRREM7-YRD.' It looks the same and has the same part number as the one HVC sells. ;)


peace and grease.
-fang
 

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Discussion Starter #34
Hi guys. I dropped the cylinders and pistons off at a new machinist almost two months ago, and he botched up one of my jugs.

I've been in a holding pattern since he told me things were screwed up -- about two weeks.

Otherwise, things are buttoned up and ready to go.

Needless to say, I'm pissed.

-fang
 

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Discussion Starter #37
I was on the 2nd to last over bore, and he opened the cylinder too much. Remember that these cylinders have the intakes ported for a bigger reed box, so that makes them a little special.... Really, it would not be a big deal, but the pistons I want are out of stock. I've put it off for a little while, and now its time to make things happen.
 

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that really sucks that he botched the cylinder... :( I always watch these 2 stroke projects with eager anticipation
 

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Discussion Starter #39
Thanks Raven, but nah.... It really is not the end of the world.

We decided that since I was originally going to pay $100 for the work, he will cover any expenses that go beyond $100 and do everything else for free, plus some extra freebies. Fortunately I have a set of spare 'junk' cylinders that Snorkelfork threw my way, so It looks like the best solution is to buy a set of pistons and do all the prep work on these other cylinders. He will let me use his superior equipment to open the intakes again, and he will weld up the windows I make, deck the heads, help me with a spark plug thread repair (helicoil gone bad), and stuff like that -- all at the original cost.

The only real problem right now is that a set of replacement pistons will cost about $150 - $200, and I sadly am suddenly too broke to pony up the cash. Once again I am in a financially motivated, indefinite holding pattern; the story of my life.

Thanks all for the interest. Basically all I can do is bitch and wait. So I'll keep my peace in this thread until I have some pictures showing off how things are getting done.

Peace and grease,
fang
 

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Discussion Starter #40
My pistons arrived in the country. Now only a few more days for the to get to me, and then back from the machinist. The pistons are the same as the ones in the pics in the first post, + a few thousandths larger.

Maybe back on the road next week? That would be the cat's meow.

peace and grease.
-fang
 
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