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Discussion Starter #1
seems to me if you look long enough at everything you find some where on the net posting what your looking for trouble is the TIME lol so far Ive found a few sites that post rearsets for vintage bikes the owners custom fabricated .Looks like thats the only way to go unless some of you are aware of other methods.so in general japanese bikes from 70-80s I havent seen many choices in rear sets .Has any one looked into this area .I was looking at benjies cafe racer site he seems to not even bother just looks un comfortable to me.cafe bars either clip ones or clubmans seem to be more comfortable with rear sets installed.what do you guys here think.Or if any one has a mix bag of parts they have figured out works .just looking at options....
 

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every model has different problems with mounting stuff up. so theres no one answer. you could buy them off the shelf from a few different companies. most people either make thier own, fab them from bits, or buy the basics and make the rest. no one ever said it was easy to look cool. if it was, every jackass would have a bike with rearsets and clubmans. and personaly, i find the 550 most comfy with clubmans using the stock foot pegs. unless im on the highway. to be honest, i feel like a total tool on the highway with my helmet on the tank. so i only do it when theres no one out there to see me.

jc
 

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LOL well It will happen anyway all the cool stuff gets discovered and you just keep reinventing cool stuff...nothing personal put I noticed you saying you were a closet tool...lol no malice just left your guard open .anyway thanks for your response Its not hard making anything for a bike after youve spent years with old sports cars and vintage racers just seeing whats the norm Ive found a few sets out there just seems like stuff between 70and 80s is not as organized as vintage cars are .there are some few companys specialising in some models others are a stab in the dark.Just thought most here are doing the same thing looking under rocks and sheds and barns and found somebody making rear sets or pieces that are widely known to fit just a time saver its something getting harder to come by rather be building and riding then deep into a cyber search engine..George



Edited by - LiLBull on Oct 16 2005 6:02:50 PM
 

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I'll blow my brains out if I see Ace Cafe shit for sale at Walmart.

What kind of bike are you trying to find them for?

I'm running Norvil rearsets on the Atlas and Raask rearsets on the Honda. Bought from Norvil and Ebay respectively.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
thanks for the replys see how resourcefull you guys are ...I knew you could save my eyes from staring into cyber space longer then I have to "insearch of" I much rather be adjusting twin leading shoe brakes..So thanks again!



Edited by - LiLBull on Oct 17 2005 08:16:34 AM
 

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Becareful of raask rearsets, the cast aluminum they are made out of is prone to breakage under normal use, espically on bikes that vibrate a lot (2 stroke street bikes).

Tarozzi is nice but expensive.

Used dunstalls are solid but heavy. Also hard to find for some models.

Personally I prefer to make my own out of crashed sportbike parts. I am fond of the triumph t595, speed triple, daytona rearsets from 1995-2000. They are one bolt construction which means anywhere you have a hole you can mount them (like the passenger peg mount for example). I have a set on my h1 drag bike through the passenger peg mount and a set going on my 1978 supersport honda bolted to a special plate replacing the heavy aluminum foot peg mounts. The only gripe I have about them is the brake lever hangs a little too low with the stock brake tab used on a drum brake setup. In one instance I have had a friend tig a new tab on, in the other I just live with it. Fzr400/600 are also good donors, one bolt construction. Stay away from 2002 r6, the brake is one bolt but the shifter is not. I used a set on my h1 streetfighter because I needed a rear master cylinder mount (built in on the brackets) but I had to use all the brackets and it was not as easy.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Geeto any pictures of your bikes I never get enough looking at caferacers they are all so personally honed ...its great looking at custom bikes its never ending inspiration.Thanks for your great tips George
 

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quote:
Geeto any pictures of your bikes I never get enough looking at caferacers they are all so personally honed ...its great looking at custom bikes its never ending inspiration.Thanks for your great tips George
Sadly my last Digital camera broke a year ago and I have not replaced it. I am saving up for an SLR digi cam, but for now I still shoot film. Most of the pics I have are the bikes in the progress stages and not completed (well they never really are completed are they).

They are more the kind of bikes that you need to see in person to appreciate anyway as they have subtle detailing rather than radical changes. I like to use stock bodywork where ever I can. Often the bike will be repainted in a factory scheme but not stock colors. I try to make the bike look like it came from the factory like the way it is - very clean build style. Most of the time when I take the h1/streetfighter out a lot of people who don't know vintage bikes think it is a bike from the late 80's, they don't realize it is a 1974 and a two stroke. I showed the bike to a friend who is a diehard kawasaki triple freak when I first put the fzr600 front end on it and he said it looked like a factory installation.

The 1976 cb750 Super sport is more of a restoration of a vintage cafe racer. I got the bike from a friend who runs a bike shop on Long Island. He built it in 1976 for a friend of his. The owner basically ran through every catalog and put every go fast part on the bike except the bodywork. It has dunstall rearsets (rare for a Supersport - the only set I have ever seen), tomiselli bar (now clipons) GL1000 front end (dual disc and huge calipers), 811cc kit, POSA dual carb setup (now a cycle-ex dual mukuni setup), 630 chain conversion, and accel coils. The only parts I added to it were a cb450 headlight/speedo combo and a pair of clipons, I also binned the stock turn signals. Bike runs stock bodywork (which I recently dented...ugh).

The 1978 supersport I picked up from Rosko on this board. At the time I had an extra body set for a cb750F lying around and I wanted to do something with it. The scheme is stock but the color is a bright metallic blue with a gold swoosh stripe (the stock one is orange). So far that bike has only the body work and clubman bars. I have a set of the t595 rearsets on a pair of custom plates I made from diamond plate but I am still trimming them to fit. Should be pretty trick when done. Other than that the bike is bone stock.

My 1975 daily rider is a stock looking bike but it has some tricks. Superbike bar for that sleeper look, Hallowed out stock pipes, metzler tires, 75 supersport carbs (they are bigger), K&N filter in the stock airbox, reworked stock forks with progressive springs (still a little too soft for my weight) and Koni dial a ride shocks in the stock dust covers. It hauls the mail, and is extremely easy to ride. I ride it loke an enduro in manhattan (yes I have ridden it through a contstruction site once and on a sidewalk once).

The Harley my father and I built looks like a stock 1997 fatboy until you get to the right side of the bike. It has an eaton roots blower on it, Drag specalities six piston calipers front and rear. Runs stock paint job on a pair of 5 gallon fat bobs (had to send the tanks back to harley for that one) and LED lights in all the stock housings and a dyna 2000 ignition. The bike is too fast for it's brakes and keeps up with most squid gixxer 750s.

All the other bikes are in pieces right now or are boring stockers.
 

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i'm looking for some rearsets, and can go with raask, tarozzi or custom fabrication. here's 4 pics of the raask and tarozzi rearsets and fitment locations:

http://groups.msn.com/mybikes/kz550information.msnw?Page=2

i've read good and bad about raask, in terms of quality and fitment. the tarozzi seems to get good reviews (if a bit expensive), but some say it is too "gadgetry". or i can have a set custom made locally for the same price as the tarozzi.

does anyone have any comments/experience on which way to go. thx
 

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I get people asking me to weld the Tarozzi's all the time. The shifters break right off and since they are cast aluminum they don't weld particularly well.

Got at set on the bench right now. Guy wants me to fabricate a new shifter lever for it that won't break so easy.
JohnnyB
 

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thx for the replies. here's a DIY, using the rearsets from a 1998-2002 CBR929RR/RC51:

"Okay....here is an old post on making universal rearsets to fit the
older Honda CB's. Most all the CB(twins and inline 4's) Hondas have
1" diam. frame tubes and this works great. I posted this a long time
ago on another Yahoo Group....thought i'd repost it here. This is the
setup i'm using on the CR350 racer and i'm now see some of the
vintage road racers using this setup.....enjoy!!

Here is a very easy and functional way to get some very nice rearsts
for most cafe bikes with very little metal fab or machining.

1. Purchase 4......universal 3-Piece 1 inch frame clamps from Dennis
Kirk(800-323-9280), part number=h27-036.......$5.99ea. {I just checked, they're actually 6.99 now. Not that it's really important}

2. Need to look on EBAY for 1998-2002 Honda CBR929RR/RC51
rearsets....usually run about $20 to $40 per set. You will need the
rearset brakets(right & left), both heel gaurds, shift lever, & rear
brake lever with return spring. You can usually find all these
together as a set or with only a few parts missing or damaged. I have
purchase a few sets with road rashed pegs for very cheap. Usually, you
can purchase some aftermarket pegs from the local bike shop for around
$20.

3. Purchase some threaded rod($1.57 for 3 foot piece...approx) from
local hardware store to fab up the shift and rear brake linkages. I
have always purchased smooth round rod, then once cut to
size.....threaded the ends using a tap/die set.

4. Depending on application, you may need to use a spacer between the
frame clamps and the rearset mounting braket. On my CB350's I have
used a 1 inch aluminum spacer to locate the peg out away from the
swingarm for clearance.

I have some pics on my website of these rearsets being used on my 1972
Honda CR350 and also on my 1970 Honda CBXR350 Inverted front fork
hybrid. Feel free to visit the site at:

http://www.OHIOCAFERACERS.com"

from here:

http://www.scooterbbs.com/board/DCForumID10/667.html

i've added the DIY pics to the link in my earlier post.

but it won't work for me, because they would sit too far back, too close to the passenger pegs, which i want to keep.

i'm leaning in favour of raask, because of the price, mild ergonomic change, and convenience of purchase/installation. i'm kinda repeating my earlier post, but any negative or positive comment/experience with raask in particular? thx again.



Edited by - el kabong on Oct 22 2005 10:20:50 PM
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I have enjoyed reading the posts ...seems like there is a big world attached to each small area of a bike ..when you really start to look into it ...just cool stuff .
 
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