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Looks ok if you feel like paying 170ish for it. Why do you want to get rid of the tubes anyway? I know it can be easier for tire changes and whatnot, but plenty of people race on tubes and don't have issues. I've also seen people used old tubes with some sealant wrapped tightly around the rim to get a seal, can probably do the whole shebang for 20 bucks
 

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Discussion Starter #3
It's an ongoing discussion on another forum. I personally think it is over priced by $100 and not necessary. I coat a lot of 3 pc. wheels(auto) and they are just sealed with Black RTV. The argument is what happens if you want to replace spoke or something, then the silicone is a pain. Yes, but how often do you need to change a spoke and if so just cut the RTV out clean the spot and reseal it. Tubes can create friction in a tire and this cause inflation of the pressure and is not recommended for racing. It also makes changing tires more time consuming with tubes.
 

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Also the weight of the tube can make a noticeable difference in handling on a racebike. That being said, I thought there is a difference in rim profile for tube vs. tubeless rims. I have never tried to run spoke wheels without a tube either on the track or street.

But, it is an interesting concept.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Ken, Is there difference between a tubeless tire and a tube tire in the bead? I think not and therefore how would the wheel notice any difference in the way the tube seals against the rim? I converted my Kimtabs from tube to tubeless. I had to machine a modification to the valve stem holes is all, but I do notice the bead not seating correctly so far. The modification was because the radius inside the skinny wheel was so small the bolt in valve stem wouldn't seat and seal properly and the hole was just big enough for the tire stem. I bored the hole and recessed it to fit the new stem.





 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Step by step process for much less. Never tried it myself though.

Tubeless - cyb's Photos
This guy has no common sense. He had to mark with tape the spoke he started with so he would know where to stop. Common sense says to start with the spoke next to the valve stem hole, DUH.
I love when a guy does a 13 page tutorial and then says: "I do not recommend any of the products or methods used here."
I do not recommend any of the products or methods used here. I do not recommend any of the products or methods used here. I do not recommend any of the products or methods used here.
 

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Yes, there is a difference between tubed and tubeless rims
That wheel you modified looks pretty porous, does it loose air or does the paint seal it?
Personally I would worry about silicon centrifuging off rim so I think I'll stick with tubes (plus, I actually know how to change tyres so it isn't a big deal)
 

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Tubeless rims should have a Safety bump or DOT bump to hold the tire seated in case of a blow out. This is why some rims are harder to break the bead then others. Tube rims don't alway have the safety bumps for instance dirt bike rims use rim locks instead other might not have either.
I'll stick with tubes.
 

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I'm pretty sure that a tubeless rim has a little ridge on either side that is supposed to help the tire stay seated if it looses pressure. I can't find any reference to it right now though.. my computer at work blocks a lot of sites...
It's an MT profile designed to keep bead seated if pressure is low or you get a blow-out
Harley use it on spoked rims
It doesn't prevent tyre spinning on rim though, rim/bead locks can
 
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