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Discussion Starter #1
Any bike have such a thing? I know that early Goldwings and '76 cb750A bikes have shouldered alloy rims, but the rears on those are only 17". Anything come with 18" from the factory? I don't really feel like paying $200 for a new 18" rim...
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Just thought of this - are the widths of the Goldwing front rims wider than the width of a cb750A front rim? Possibly use a Goldwing front rim on the back of my 450?
 

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european and british bikes

borriani's, akront, sun... and then some un-named copies
 

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quote:Originally posted by ejand22
I don't really feel like paying $200 for a new 18" rim...
Unfortunately, that's usually the best way to get a rim that will work with out any problems. When you get a new rim, you will usually be asked what bike/hub it will be mounted to so you can get the correct spoke hole angles.
When buying a used rim, you usually dont know what it came off of and if you do know what it came off of, there is no way to be 100% sure it will work for your application (unless it is off the same bike you are putting it on).
When the spoke holes are drilled in the rim at the factory, they are drilled to match a specific hub width and diameter. The angles that the holes are at will be at will be different for a large drum brake hub than they will be at for a smaller disc brake hub. Some disc brake hubs are larger than most others (ie= GL 1000 rear, and some BMW), so you cant always go just by the "disc' or "drum' hub drilling.
Some British bikes have conical hubs(drum brake) where one side of the hub is larger than the other side is (it would have 1 side close to the disc brake size hub and the other side close to a drum brake hub size- kinda like some older Japanese dirt bike front brakes-RT1MX).
Here's a set of aluminum shouldered rims laced to CB 750 K hubs. Both rims were drilled for a smaller disc brake hub. The front works fine and the spokes line up like they should, but the rear spokes are not at the proper angle (they are cocked where the spoke and nipple meet)and would be a weak link in the wheel. If used like this the spokes would be likely to break where the spoke and nipple meet because of the cocked connection (it doesnt have a straight pull like a spoke/nipple should). This rear wheel wasnt used in this configuration.
Spending the cash and getting a new rim that will work may be cheaper in the long run than buying a bunch of used rims that wont work.
DG

 

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Discussion Starter #6
Very good point Mr. Fisher. Ok, new question - is it worth going anywhere other than Buchanan Spoke and Rim?
 

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Well, at Buchanans you would be able to get the spokes and rims at 1 place and they would be able to lace them up for you if needed.
I'm sure there are other places, but Buchanans is the well known place for rims and spokes and have been doing it for years.
The rims pictures are shouldered/drop center rims and require shorter spokes than the non-dropped(stock steel) center rims. The front spokes (stock) needed to be shortened to fit. Spokes need to be threaded with a spoke roller. A die that cuts threads into a spoke will weaken the spoke and SHOULD NOT be done. All these thing need to be taken into concideration when weighing the cost of a new set of rims/spokes VS. using the CB750 A wheels. It would probably be alot cheaper in the long run to get the 750A rims and settle for the 17 inch rear wheel.
I eventually used the rear rim in the picture above. I ended up lacing it to a 750 K front disc brake hub and converted the wheel for rear use by making a sprocket adaptor, disc adaptor, spacers and caliper mount and changing the bearings for the 20mm rear axle. It was alot of work to get them to work, but man those rims look nice!!
The rims that are pictured above were bought at a yard sale and I was lucky that I was able to use them on my application. Sometimes you can get lucky when buying unknown parts, but its always a crap shoot.
DG

 

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can you tell us about that sprocket adapter? how do you handle the cush drive, or did you just skip it?
 

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I got rid of the cush drive. The bike previously had Shelby-Dowd mag wheels on it that also deleted the cush drive. It's been in this configuration for the last year or so and I havent had any problems with it.
Heres a pic of the wheel assembly under construction.

The chunk of aluminum in the pic is what the sprocket adaptor started out as. I ended up putting another bearing in the end of the adaptor so the wheel has 3 X 20mm bearings in it now ( complete with the bearing spacers). I also put locating pins in the hub and sprocket adaptor (to lock the hub and sprocket adaptor together and take the turing force as 1 unit). The disc mounting bolts go all the way through the hub to the sprocket adaptor and hold the unit together. The pins keep the turning force from being applied only to the disc mounting bolts.

A few pics (the caliper was just wired on in these pics, but is currently installed and working as shown in the pic above)


 

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Buchanans are great to deal with.

However, what hub are you wanting to lace a wheel to?

I don't disagree with anything posted but....

sometimes, you really don't have to have a rim custom drilled to make it work

sometimes, a rim exists that is close enough to do the business

work well and last a long time


to date, I've built many wheels which has involved marrying hubs of various origin to rims originating from other places

I've yet to ever require anything other than a set of custom made spokes

Buchanans said a 4LS buffalo hub could be put on a certain Tubasaki 18 inch shouldered alloy rim which exists

I can show you that's not true but it did take a bit of modfying to make everything copasetic

I can also show you quite a few Buchanans custom made spokes used to marry stuff together

they are marked with an "X" on the head and not the normal "B"
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I'm not looking to do anything crazy, just relace some cb450 hubs to shouldered rims. Wanted to swap to a front drum on my '71, so I bought a CL wheel assembly and thought that while I'm at it I'd look into trying to get some shouldered rims.

It sounds like Buchanan can take care of anything I may need, it's just a matter of how much greem I'm willing to spend.
 

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nothing but a thing to lace that to one of several already drilled existing Borianni

simpler than crapping in the well and not nearly as dangerous

you may actually find that a factory version of that equivilant brake drum exists already laced up to a shouldered rim

In fact, I know it does

Ran one on Caballo Diablo and as far as I know

the guy that currently owns it still has that honda front wheel on it, think the forks are KZ but that's been many years ago so my memory could easily be in need of calibrating

my guess is you could find pix of that bike but if you can't

I'm sure I have some somewhere including front wheel details
 

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Mr Fischer - I'm curious - I note the spoke pattern you have on that wheel has one spoke actually laying on top of the other, and all inside the wheel, rather than the usual (to me) one inside, one outside.

Is is ok to lay out spokes like this? Were yours pre-bent to accommodate this?
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Hack - I can't find any info about that bike. Would you mind sharing some more information or photos? Specifically, which bike came with that drum on shouldered rims?

Mr. Fischer - I'm I reading you correctly, did you lace the 17" rear rim to a front hub and where the angles on the holes ok? Or did you just use the 19" rim on the rear?
 

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My rear rim is a 18 incher and my way of getting it to work is probably a little on the extreme side of how to do it. I have a lathe, mill and rolling machine(spoke rolling machine,that is[8D].
The spokes are an unknown application and needed to be shortened to fit the rim. The bends in the overlapping spokes line up perfectly (the bend sits right on the spoke underneath). I put the spokes on the inner hub to give me more clearance for the caliper, and they give a straighter pull when laced to the inside than they did when laced up conventionaly. Alot of the 16 inch CB 750 rear wheel conversions have the spokes on the inside like this wheel(they use a 16 inch H-D rim). Wheels with all spokes laced to the inside of the hub are a pain in the a$$ to lace up.
Both the rims were drilled for the smaller disc brake size hub. When I laced the rear 18 inch rim to the CB 750 drum brake hub, I was told that I could "probably" modify (drill out)the holes in the rim to straighten the pull for the cocked spokes and it would "probably" be fine. I wanted a disc brake anyhow and too many "probablys" kept me from "egg-ing" out the holes and "possibly" ruining the rim. It "probably" could have been done, but it would have been needed to be done on the 20 drive pull spokes to straighten out the pull on the spokes/nipples.
I'm sure there are wheels that will lace to your CB 450 drum brake hub with nothing more than a set of new spokes, I just dont know what they would be. Alot of the Kawasaki's, Harley's and Honda's have 40 spoke rims, most of the Suzuki's, and Yamaha's have 36 spoke rims. You have to count the spokes on any wheel you maybe interested in because some of the smaller Honda's and Kawasaki's have 36 spoke rims. Ask questions, get measurements (hub diameter and width)and compare the measurements to your CB 450 hub. Buying a used rim with the hub still attached would be a better bet than buying a used bare rim, as there is no way to tell what it may or may not fit.
DG
 
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