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quote:I loved how all the men stopped at looked at the camera as if they were mad at it.
At the time, movie cameras were hand cranked, and large. There is also a driver in the front, right where the camera seems to be shooting from, and there would be no room for a movie camera there. There must have been a platform on the front of that one, with a camera on a tripod, guy behind it cranking away - quite a spectacle, as motion pictures were still quite new back then. The quality of the movies at the time depended on the quality of the cameraman, and how consistent he kept his crank speed. If he sped up or slowed down, it would affect how the film played back, which could explain why some people seem to slow down in front of the streetcar (although I did notice one little kid deliberately linger in front).

Further, that is technically not a streetcar, but a cable car - completely unpowered, which is why they ring a bell instead of a horn. IIRC, they stop running after dark, because they have no lights, but I could be mistaken about that. The center "rail" in the track is a gap, beneath which is a cable running on pulleys. There is a powerhouse in the city (it's still there, operating) which powers all the cables, and the cable car has a mechanism which extends into the gap & grabs the appropriate cable, and thats how they move. At the end of the line, there are turntables, so they can turn them around & go back in the opposite direction. When not overrun by tourists, they are still a good way to get around the city - or were in the 70s, when I was there. Interesting that they also had electric streetcars running there, even way back then.
 

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quote:I loved how all the men stopped at looked at the camera as if they were mad at it.
At the time, movie cameras were hand cranked, and large. There is also a driver in the front, right where the camera seems to be shooting from, and there would be no room for a movie camera there. There must have been a platform on the front of that one, with a camera on a tripod, guy behind it cranking away - quite a spectacle, as motion pictures were still quite new back then. The quality of the movies at the time depended on the quality of the cameraman, and how consistent he kept his crank speed. If he sped up or slowed down, it would affect how the film played back, which could explain why some people seem to slow down in front of the streetcar (although I did notice one little kid deliberately linger in front).

Further, that is technically not a streetcar, but a cable car - completely unpowered, which is why they ring a bell instead of a horn. IIRC, they stop running after dark, because they have no lights, but I could be mistaken about that. The center "rail" in the track is a gap, beneath which is a cable running on pulleys. There is a powerhouse in the city (it's still there, operating) which powers all the cables, and the cable car has a mechanism which extends into the gap & grabs the appropriate cable, and thats how they move. At the end of the line, there are turntables, so they can turn them around & go back in the opposite direction. When not overrun by tourists, they are still a good way to get around the city - or were in the 70s, when I was there. Interesting that they also had electric streetcars running there, even way back then.
 

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San Fran has both cable and street. The modern busses down market street are electric street cars. And they do run at night. Wife and I were there October of last year and the cable cars most certainly had lights.

New Orleans has only street cars run on electricfied wire, no cable cars. They ring a bell and use horns, but most operators find that the horn confuses drrivers and they look around for another car, where as a bell is unmistakable.
 

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San Fran has both cable and street. The modern busses down market street are electric street cars. And they do run at night. Wife and I were there October of last year and the cable cars most certainly had lights.

New Orleans has only street cars run on electricfied wire, no cable cars. They ring a bell and use horns, but most operators find that the horn confuses drrivers and they look around for another car, where as a bell is unmistakable.
 

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Haven't been there since the 70s, so my info is limited. At that time, they did stop running at night. After some research, seems they completely rebuilt the system beginning in 1979.
 

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Haven't been there since the 70s, so my info is limited. At that time, they did stop running at night. After some research, seems they completely rebuilt the system beginning in 1979.
 

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That was fun to watch. One thing I noticed after a minute or two was that it was almost ALL MEN on the streets. I guess in 1906 the women were back home doing the laundry with a washboard.
 

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That was fun to watch. One thing I noticed after a minute or two was that it was almost ALL MEN on the streets. I guess in 1906 the women were back home doing the laundry with a washboard.
 

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Yep, that's Market Street, northeast-bound, from Van Ness to the Ferry Building.

If you got off that streetcar at the end, and walked north, you would be in Chinatown. Drop off your laundry at Sing's on Stockton Street. Faint odor of opium coming from an unmarked door at Grant and Pacific. Better move along quickly, and get out before dark, when groups of young men with knives roam the fog-shrouded streets looking for easy marks.

Go south to the Mission District. Dusty, horse-poop-covered streets. Grimy warehouses full ship's provisions and contraband. The smell of salt and seagull droppings in the air. Flea-infested flophouses and seedy bars full of drunken sailors.
 

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Yep, that's Market Street, northeast-bound, from Van Ness to the Ferry Building.

If you got off that streetcar at the end, and walked north, you would be in Chinatown. Drop off your laundry at Sing's on Stockton Street. Faint odor of opium coming from an unmarked door at Grant and Pacific. Better move along quickly, and get out before dark, when groups of young men with knives roam the fog-shrouded streets looking for easy marks.

Go south to the Mission District. Dusty, horse-poop-covered streets. Grimy warehouses full ship's provisions and contraband. The smell of salt and seagull droppings in the air. Flea-infested flophouses and seedy bars full of drunken sailors.
 

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quote:Originally posted by steve barker

Yep, that's Market Street, northeast-bound, from Van Ness to the Ferry Building.

If you got off that streetcar at the end, and walked north, you would be in Chinatown. Drop off your laundry at Sing's on Stockton Street. Faint odor of opium coming from an unmarked door at Grant and Pacific. Better move along quickly, and get out before dark, when groups of young men with knives roam the fog-shrouded streets looking for easy marks.

Go south to the Mission District. Dusty, horse-poop-covered streets. Grimy warehouses full ship's provisions and contraband. The smell of salt and seagull droppings in the air. Flea-infested flophouses and seedy bars full of drunken sailors.
is that then or now?
 
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