Cafe Racer Forum banner

1 - 20 of 33 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
306 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
just taking a quick survey here....i've heard duplicolor is pretty good from multiple sources(check out krapfever's cb160), but then again i've heard alot of things...

it'd be cool to hear some opinions/reviews, along with some pics...




"Never mind the track. The track is for punks. We are Road People. We are Cafe Racers." -Hunter S. Thompson
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
I'll have a review of PJ1 in a couple days. It's more than the others, but supposed to be good stuff.

“Riding is and always will be my first priority. Through the distractions and inevitable failures in other parts of my life I know that all I have to do to feel better is ride.”-Ryan Clark
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
Boy do I have experience with rattle can paint.

I've had the best luck with duplicolor engine paint, the colors are limited but it's fairly resistant to gas and oil after a few days. The regular paint will wash off even after weeks if you get a gas spill. You can even bake the engine paint to 350 deg (if the part is small enough) for a really smooth and durable surface. They also have a clear engine paint so you can do a color coat and then shoot a clear coat on top for a deeper finish. It's important to follow the directions (strange concept - right) especially about temperature.
I tried the water based paint Rustoleum H2O thinking it would give me a gas resistant surface but couldn't get a smooth finish with it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,112 Posts
Uhh, thanks for the compliment. Just don't look too closely.



Grill/barbecue paint works pretty good on headers and mufflers. Just make sure the surface is clean before you spray it (be particularly careful about oil from your hands - acetone works nicely for getting rid of this).



Honda go sideways!

http://groups.google.com/group/co-ohvinmoto
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
585 Posts
Several years ago, when I was super poor, I committed my self to diligently studying the very difficult art of shooting a high quality rattle can paint job. To this end I believe I have archived some low level of mastery.

When painting motorcycles I prefer the Duplicolor engine enamels. When cured they are more or less fuel resistant, and after they have cured for a month or three they are rock hard. IF you wet sand, polish and wax they yield an especially nice, "vintage paint" looking finish.

The down side of these paints is that it is VERY HARD to shoot a two-tone paint job with them. They simply do not layer well. They need to be shot and then clear coated while still wet. You of course need the paint to be dry to mask off for a second color, and these paints do not layer well. Their solvents will dig into the lower layer and wrinkle it up. The clear is especially bad at this -- it acts very similar to gasoline on normal paints. However, if you are shooting a solid color you can easily shoot a piece (following the instructions -- it really helps with these paints) and then immediately clear coat it while still wet, and it will look very nice. In fact, once you have done all the prep work, shooting a single color and clearcoat is fast and easy, usually taking less than an hour for the whole bike.

I have done several high quality paint jobs using only the Duplicor rattle-can high-temp engine enamel paints. That is what I used for my little orange cafe bike. As you can see in the above picture, my bike was shot in two colors, Fire-ball Orange, and then I shot black stripes on top of the orange. (I hand cut the checkers' squares and pinstripes, then applied them under the clear coat.) I ended up stripping and re-shooting each piece at least two or three times before I finally got it to stick. I have come to the conclusion that shooting two-tone paint with these paints is simply a loosing battle.</u> Even though my paint looks good, actually VERY GOOD, every piece has small flaws in it from the shooting process wrinkling some. I found that if I let the paint dry about two weeks in a hot, dry environment (like the Texas sun) it is less likely to wrinkle on the second color and clear coat. Actually, I usually could get the second coat down OK, IT IS THE CLEAR COAT THAT WRINKLES THE PAINT THE WORST when shot on already dry paint.

I can't tell you how frustrating it is to have been working hard on a paint job for weeks, carefully prepping the piece, then shooting it and it looking good, patiently letting things dry, only to have the final coat of clearcoat dig into the lower layers and destroy all that hard work. I am a tough guy, but my ruined paint will make me cry... just like a little girl.

SO, if one color is OK with you, the Duplicolor engine enamel paints are awesome! If you want to shoot a two color paint job, or even if you want to shoot some decals/stickers under the clear, I highly recommend using something else.

Here's some food for thought: Like the samurai master who after mastering his skills swears off fighting all together, I will no longer be painting bikes with rattle can paint. I understand it now, and it understands me. For now on I will be going back to two-part automotive paints. By the time I have repainted a bike two or three times because the paint screwed up, it would be cheaper to buy the expensive good stuff and do it right the first time. There is so much deep pain and frustration that goes with a screwed-up paint job, doubly so when you loose a very detailed, intricate paint job, that quality tools and materials are worth their weight in gold.

Peace and grease
-fang
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,303 Posts
I use rustoleum Stopsrust paint. The reason I use it is because it is fuel reisitant, it has a wide selection of colors, it is a rust paint (similar to por 15)so it goes on really well on bare metal, requires minimal prep (sand, wipe with mineral spirits), and gives a decent shine. I don't use metallics, only solid colors and do a lot of wetsanding polishing afterwards to clean it up. I like it as a single stage because if I scratch it or have to repaint a section it is much easier to hide the damage. I occasionally use a roller to apply it with it thinned to 80/20 with mineral spirits and put on about 8 coats. The paint is self leveling at that mix but kinda thin on coverage.

If I really want a hard durable single stage since I use Brightside Yacht Paint. The stuff rolls on (with a foam roller), is self leveling, and hardcore strong. It is actually a better single stage poly than MAACO, EARL SCHIEB, etc use because it is marine grade. If laying over bare metal you will need to prime with their primer but it is roll on too.

Now the secret to any finish is having a perfectly straight surface before laying down paint, and to do a proper wet sand job at the end complete with 1000 grit paper, white compound, and glaze. It will take a couple of months for any fresh paint to truely harden.

You will never get more than a medicore metallic paint job out og a rattle can. For the amount of work you need to do in setup to keep junk out of the paint you might as well be straying two part with a proper gun. You can't really wetsand metallic single stage rattle can jobs because the metal flakes shift and can become all streaky.

If you want to shoot flat colors, always go for semi-gloss or satin. True flats turn chalky in the sun as they lack UV protection.

to me a true rattle can job is single stage. If you are shooting two stages out of cans all the time it is twice the work, and really if you are going to paint your bike more than once, you might as well invest in a cheap gun and use real automotive paint. This is provided you already own a compressor and respirator.

if you want to see the kind of work that goes into a rattle can job pre and post spraying (or rolling) - look at this thread:

http://board.moparts.org/ubbthreads/showflat.php?Cat=0&Number=2331682&page=0&fpart=1&vc=1

READ THE WHOLE THING. There is so much info here (and a lot of bickering to sift through) that it is worth it.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,645 Posts
I vote that link as ++++awesome. wish I had seen it before I went through so many cans of spraypaint...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,303 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,303 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,187 Posts
.Its good for motors.Frames and Tanks should get rugged urethane or powder coat.You can paint everything with cans of paint.But its niether thick nor durable !Most of the duplicolor stuff is great for motors(thin is IN for an aluminum motor to breath and cool properly).But its so thin to get a good coat of paint and as most are lacquer or acrylic they shrink in addition to being thin.
Tip :buy more then you think you need,prep is key to a great finnish ,NO SHORT CUTS allowed (because they dont exist)
make sure you read, the back of the can ,to be sure its the same type of paint, and write down, the can color number, before you chuck it in the trash.So you have same color and same type of paint.
You can do it. shake N spray, away on that funky cafe!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
306 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
thanks dudes!


hey geeto, i think im gonna try this brightside stuff...is it fairly gas resistant?

i really liked the rollyourcar.com link...the guy has simplified it all with clear and easy to follow instructions...

speaking of painting stuff, im currently painting my handmade thinline telecaster in a vintage dirty blonde, using old school nitro rattle cans (via reranch.com)...the nitrocellulose paint is awesome for guitars, but i'd imagine its not too great for bikes...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,898 Posts
i guess an acceptable result (rolled corvair) but what a ton of work. 2-color seems to fall down with the roller program. better yet, get to know your local body guy (or chick), find out what beer is good for them, do all the prep, masking, and offer to buy/pick up the (automotive)paint. you'd be doing all the prep rolling or ratling it any way. have them shoot it, nothing else. all the other stuff is why paint jobs are expensive. good beer and all the prep WILL make it affordable. or make a booth and shoot it yourself with real paint (with clear if you want). it will look better and last longer. all that being said, my racer frame is krylon gloss black (cheap, shitty, and always available at the local wally world) which i can perpetually touch up with little concern for the inevitable scratches etc... they come with the territory.
-parks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,303 Posts
I had to resort to rollers after my neighbors reported me to environmental control. Nothing beats a proper two part automotive finish. Knowing your body guy is def key. However, not all of out close body guys are "beer pliable" and round here it is really easy for something to end up in paint jail (just ask DiamondJ whose tins were at my friend's shop for over a year)

Single stage solid colors have a nice vintage feel because that was the way EVERYTHING was painted until about the late 1950s (probably about 1959 or so). MY 1967 GTO's paint is factory single stage burgundy from GM. You can do two color but it takes a lot of work. However the old Laquer jobs were all single stage and with a good solid poly you can emulate some of that laquer "feel". I don't think anything will match that old pre-EPA laquer luster and depth but there is something very warm and fuzzy about a nice worn in single stage paint finish.

Interlux brightside is absolutly fuel resistant. After reading all those posts and threads I started using it as a frame paint because it is self leveling and easy.

I am thinking of repainting my Fender Jaguar. Thanks for the Link.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,898 Posts
quote: "my neighbors reported me to environmental control"
are you and your neighbors...close?
you make me laugh with many posts...
-parks
ps laquer is so fragile...like a beautiful flower...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,303 Posts
quote:Originally posted by parks61

quote: "my neighbors reported me to environmental control"
are you and your neighbors...close?
you make me laugh with many posts...
-parks
ps laquer is so fragile...like a beautiful flower...
My neighbors are FOB chinese who bought the 4 family house next to mine and immediatly made it into an illegal 12 family. After they reported me to ECB I reported them to fair housing. I am pretty convinced they do it just to chase the non-asian folk out of the neighborhood because the korean guy caddy corner to me does bodywork at home and he sprays all the time and they didn't report him (and I have had other asians try and run me out of the neighborhood). I don't think it was an enviornmental issue since they dump their engine oil directly into the ground (and yes I put them through ECB for that one when I found it seeping into my garage).

The best part is the double standards they have. They rented out a parking spot to a guy with a 1965 impala convertible. One night he comes to work on the car and has it running at 1 AM with open exhaust and it is smoking up the neighborhood. I didn't say anything but a week later I was working on my GTO at 6:30 pm (and my car has mufflers) and she comes running over to tell me in best broken english how my loud car woke up their new baby and how they didn't want me to run it again or "we call cops". So in front of her I called the cops and filed a harassment complaint (and tresspassing since she came into my backyard uninvited).

In an effort to end this back and forth I put pu a new really high fence to replace the rotted but really high fence that was there, and had a buddy of mine cut them a break on a roofing job. Since then, she stays on her side and I stay on mine.


Anyway, laquer is beautiful. When I used to be in the corvette business/hobby, I used to see all the beautiful laquer jobs shot from the 1960s-1980s that were fading. I could even repair a crazed laquer job if needed. I don't think anybody born after 1985 will ever get the chance to expirence the absolutly stunning finish that only a pre EPA laquer can provide, and that is a shame.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
306 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
hey geeto,

if you have an original jag, for the love of god do not refinish it! but if it's a reissue, then i suggest using a heat gun and scraper to get most of the poly finish off. also, you may or may not know, nearly all the vintage fender colors were based off the factory GM colors of the time...i really love "sonic blue" which is based on a '56 caddy. here's an article about the whole thing:

http://www.provide.net/~cfh/fenderc.html

have any colors in mind for the jaguar?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
69 Posts
We used rustoleum to paint a 69 SS camaro with a roller. Came out GREAT. I have no pcitures now but I assure you it worked. Roll on paint, wet sand, paint wet sand. We did 6 coats, wet sanding after each and then laid another 4 coats of clear and it looked show room perfect...almost.

Also, we painted over the original paint. All we did was sand the clear coat off.
 
1 - 20 of 33 Posts
Top