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That's easy, none of them, GSX750E never came with USD forks.

Your RSU forks look like they slipped down on the stanchion tubes an awful lot. That seems to be a common problem, we see that a lot on here. You're going to bottom those out super easy, be careful with that, motorcycles don't handle very well once they run out of suspension travel.
 

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These would be appropriate and very nice, but even they won't just plug right in.
The stanchion tubes are large diameter so your heavy steel stock triple tree yokes are going to be all wrong and require replacing, modern forks are designed to carry a large diameter lightweight axle where your bike features a skinny steel bolt for an axle. Your brakes are shite by decades of obsolescence and the clip-ons you already bought won't fit anything you go with.

What's your operating budget? Modern motorcycle forks are expensive!
 

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Building 2 GS1100E's for vintage racing. We are using RSU forks with Olhins cartridges. We found that the best swap was Honda Superhawk forks and clamps as these let you use the SHawk brakes or up-grade to Honda 929 calipers and racing pads. AllBalls has the bits to make it work. You can also go with Honda 600 F 3 front end but it is a wee bit more involved. Remember no matter what you go with there's spacing and wheel size to consider not to mention with wheel you may start having clearance issues. You are in a world where NOTHING IS JUST BOLT ON. Just saying. Oh; and the forks in your photo sure don't look as if they belong on a Suzuki GS750.

Cheers
Rich
 

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Rifo, Went back and took a look at your pic's I didn't notice before but with those forks the axle has about 35mm of lead where most of the forks we're talking about have zero lead. You are going to change the geometry of your front end so keep that in mind.

Rich
 

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Rifo, Went back and took a look at your pic's I didn't notice before but with those forks the axle has about 35mm of lead where most of the forks we're talking about have zero lead. You are going to change the geometry of your front end so keep that in mind.

Rich
i think his bike is the "L" model (forks atleast) with a bunch of other parts.
 

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i think his bike is the "L" model (forks atleast) with a bunch of other parts.
In 83 they came out with the ES, and ESF which were the sport models (the F being fully faired). They dropped the L model and made the “standard” E a bit of a combination of the older standard and more cruiser-ish L. So the E model had the longer leading axle forks and the “broke back” frame. And it retained the twin shocks vs the Full Floater that the ES and ESF got.
 
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In 83 they came out with the ES, and ESF which were the sport models (the F being fully faired). They dropped the L model and made the “standard” E a bit of a combination of the older standard and more cruiser-ish L. So the E model had the longer leading axle forks and the “broke back” frame. And it retained the twin shocks vs the Full Floater that the ES and ESF got.
that engine looks pre 83, 16 valve before the tscc 16 valve model 700/750 no ?
 

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That’s a TSCC motor. Square cam end caps. They didn’t have a 16V before that.
 
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Just curious. Those forks look really long did the "L" models try and look chopper like with extended forks or might those just be from someplace completely different ?

Rich
 

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Just curious. Those forks look really long did the "L" models try and look chopper like with extended forks or might those just be from someplace completely different ?

Rich
Yes. The L was a chopper style. But that was an earlier version. His look correct for the GSX-E which had some of the chopper styling and some of the standard styling. I believe they were longer than the older standard forks, hence the leading axle to compensate for the loss of trail from the extended forks
 

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8ball, Thanks ! I will admit I know very little about the GS versions other than those we're racing.
Stiil and all one needs to keep the geometry in mind as you play with forks, shocks and their lengths. My guys like the steering to be pretty quick for places like our U.S. closed courses and then fairly slow for the road courses.
 

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8ball, Thanks ! I will admit I know very little about the GS versions other than those we're racing.
Stiil and all one needs to keep the geometry in mind as you play with forks, shocks and their lengths. My guys like the steering to be pretty quick for places like our U.S. closed courses and then fairly slow for the road courses.
dont want to hyjack this thread, but what you cookin up to race, pics , info etc, where you plan on racing? i see afm has a class of sorts for the big vintage superbikes
 

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No hyjack worries as I don't think anyone will care.
We have 5 Vintage motorbikes that we are working with.

1992 Suzuki GSXR1100, 1990 Honda VFR400/NC-30, 1980 Motoo Guzzi Le Mans, and being built are a pair of Suzuki GS1100 E's that we were talking about.

We've raced here on the left side of the USA and done Daytona Vintage races and the 200 with our Yamaha R-6 (R-6 did OK considering it's a 600). We also have raced at the Phillips Island Classic and the Manx Classic.

On of my guys has done the US races and Phillips Island and the other has almost 50 Isle of Man starts. We were planning to not only return to PI and the IOM but had planned to race some of the UK/Irish road races with our vintage bikes. At least where those are on the calendar. We'll race the R-6 in the Junior Class at some of the road events.. We have some friends that had invited us to also race their extra motorbikes where our vintage bikes can't compete.

Sadly the plague has put that all on hold for this year. With the on again and off again scheduling of events and the fact that the organizers and the UK government are not real happy with folks from the states and our vaccination procedures right now. We decided that the financial risk with shipping, transportation and lodging and then having an event DX'd or not being allowed into a country posed a threat that was just too great..

We plan to have the GS's ready in the fall and we'll race some WERA, AFM and such then with our eye's on the UK and OZ next year.

Thanks for asking and Cheers !
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 · (Edited)
Thank you very much for the answers.

I have now found out that the forks of the GSX and GSXR models (up to about 96) are interchangeable, since they have the same steering head dimensions.

If the 750 has the same masses fit the forks of the GSXR 1100 W models 93-94 both the 95-96 (are 1cm shorter) almost plug and play. You need the complete triple clamp as well as front wheel with all distances, of course also the brake system then it is really not a big problem.
 

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Thank you very much for the answers.

I have now found out that the forks of the GSX and GSXR models (up to about 96) are interchangeable, since they have the same steering head dimensions.

If the 750 has the same masses fit the forks of the GSXR 1100 W models 93-94 both the 95-96 (are 1cm shorter) almost plug and play. You need the complete triple clamp as well as front wheel with all distances, of course also the brake system then it is really not a big problem.

Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)
So they are interchangeable just as long as you change everything that is connected to them. Awesome :LOL:

There is a reason why the GSXR is one of the most stolen motorcycles in existence and you just found it. Now hurry up and get your order in for a nice hot set of GSX USD forks, they go fast.
 
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