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Discussion Starter #1
Been reading through threads and figured someone (Geeto??) might be able to answer this question. I'm 6'6", 190lbs, 36" inseam. I have been searching for awhile (especially after reading the thread where a few members suggested larger bikes for another forum member), and wanted to ask - any thoughts on a BMW R100R or a Honda CX550? Would either suit someone tall or I am better off sticking to the list below that Geeto posted years ago? I love the look of the BMW tanks and boxer style airheads, but are they large enough for me? This was Geeto's list:


cb750/900/1100F (F model supersports only! no K,L or C bikes)
KZ900/1000/Z1R (again no LTDs or any other chopper looking crap)
GS750/1000/1100 (no G models - basically if it looks like a factory chopper stay away - you want bench seats)
Any tonti framed guzzi (lemans, T3, 1000s, etc)
860GT and GTS ducati
GPZ900/1100 (think top gun)
VF1000F or VF1000R (even the 750 is ok, no 500s though)
1986-87 ZX1000R ninja (750 is ok if you can find one)
1986-87 GSXR1100 (750 is ok if you can afford one)
 

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BMW fit large riders pretty good. Stay away from bikes with small wheels and short suspension,
learn to fold up like a pretzel and you'll be just fine.
 

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Used?
The K series is nice, a little more compact but better for high speed long distance travel, can be had second hand for reasonable $ and still have great reliability, best rider aerodynamics available. Down side is they are a little light on front brake, hard to source good tires and the speedometer probably has not worked in a decade.
 

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It's not a comprehensive list by any means, It's just that I have personal experience with all the bikes on that list, and I am a taller guy at 6'5 and 34" inseam. I'll be honest, though, I've owned and ridden smaller bikes like Cj360T, cb450, vespa T5, multiple honda dream 305's, Nortons, etc... and I fit fine enough to ride them in stock trim but if I had to look at myself riding one I'm sure I'd feel like a bear riding a tricycle, in fact that is why I have bought 3 different dreams - I love they way they look and ride, but everytime I ride one into town I feel like I'm pushing a moped. Those smaller bikes though, once you put a small seat, rearsets, and clipons on them, they can get pretty uncomfortable, which is why if you want to ride a sporting bike, the list you found is a good starting place. I am surprised I don't have airhead bmw's on there, but it's probably because I didn't have one at the time and now I do - although to be fair I do hate my airhead's current riding position because it has a corbin seat on it and it's just too low without rearsets, if it had the stock seat I might feel different because I could slide back in the seat a little, but the corbin has me locked in a little too forward. I may try one of those vietnam flat seats just to see if it fits better when I can slide back.

Don't rule out new bikes too, I go to dealerships all the time and just sit on motorcycles to see how they fit. I love V7 guzzi's but they are almost a solo bike for me because of how far I have to sit back on the seat. I loved the SCR950 (the bolt based scrambler) but hate the bolt because of the low seat. Speaking of Yamaha, V-max is a can't go wrong muscle bike, but the XSR900 fits me like a glove - a little tight but the right kind of tight. I love the way the new sportster roadster looks but I can't even stand to sit on one on the showroom floor, yet the Sporty Seventy-Two fits pretty well, esp with forward controls. I love the new Z900RS and Z900RS cafe and they fit great, but I can't ride the new ZX10R because I get hip cramps right off the bat. Triumph's Thruxton R fits so great I am thinking about buying one to match my Ducati Sport 1000, and most of everything in their bonneville line is great but I literally can't ride the Bonneville bobber because it hurts my back and it's uncomfortable to turn the bars while sitting like a dog trying to shit on the carpet.

It helps to fill out your location, because if you were close to me in Cbus, I'd say meet me at Iron Pony and we would just go through and sit on a dozen or so bikes just to get a feel for what you like and should like. If this is your first bike, there is nothing wrong with financing a new or newish used bike and riding that. It sounds all badass and heroic to be "tinkering" and riding, but really I am most happy when my bikes work and I can ride them and less so when they are broken. For tall guys where motorcycling presents some limited options It's nice to get out on a bike that works and to discover what you like about the hobby. A lot of tall guys I know get into adventure touring because those are tall heavy bikes and they can kind of do it all (although not all well) which lets you take trips, do some light off roading, lean it over hard in a turn, and basically get a sample of what the hobby has to offer before diving into having a sport bike or chopper, or an old nail you are restoring.


TL;DR version: the point is to sit on as many bikes as possible to see what you like and how you feel. Also talk to other tall riders to see what they like. This way when you go to look at an old bike you can get a feel for how you are going to like it.
 

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any thoughts on a BMW R100R or a Honda CX550?
missed this part before.

R100R - you should look at. the more I learn about airheads, the more they look like the best riding of the aircooled bmws. Sure the aftermarket isn't there for custom stuff like it is for the earlier airheads, but the bike stock is just a way better bike overall. If you get one, don't do the hipster thing and cut it up to put a small seat and a seat hoop on it, ride it for a year and see how you like it stock. Also the thing I like about the 80's-90's airhead beemers is that they come pre-wired for neat stuff like heated grips, clocks, accessory ports, and 4 way flashers - and that stuff is fun to play with. If you have to have some "iron and air" twee machine, look for an earlier R80 or R100 monolever (1986-1988) - they have an aftermarket that sells bolt on subframes and seats (look at down and out's stuff in aus), There is some interchange with the old bikes esp in the seat area, and there are places like bmw cafe that sell vintage style fenders to make them look older.

CX500 - I despise these machines but it isn't because they are small and ill fitting. Stock they are fine, but cut down they are much smaller and ill fitting for taller riders. Why I don't like them is compared to the overwhelming number of aircooled machines out there, they come with some complex issues. And they aren't that fun to ride on top of it, at least not worth justifying the work involved in a triple bypass (seriously, look it up). yes they have a cult following, and they have become somewhat of a darling of the hipstergram "look at my unrideable art project" set, but they became that way because they were so dirt cheap at one point people would pay you to take them. Seriously, CB400Ts and CX500s were bikes I literally have owned for free because people wanted them out of their backyard. The frames are complex stressed member designs that some people have cut into without understanding the engineering that went into them, they were an experiment in stressed engineering for honda that mostly worked but removing things like fenders and such makes the bike ride worse fast, they have engines that are interesting on paper and less so in your right hand. The only thing going for them is that if you have a well maintained running one that bike will rack up reliable miles like it's a honda car. If you buy a nice stock running one, the best thing you can do it leave it alone and ride it till something actually wears out. If you let it sit for a while (say a year or more) you might as well throw it away. As for a custom one, if you held a gun to my head and told me I had to buy a custom cx500 or you would shoot me dead, I'm not saying that I would take that bullet but I sure would take a long time to answer.

If you really want a cx500 in the states...save your money and buy a nice, sorted running CX500 Turbo or CX650 Turbo. It's the only one worth having. If you feel like being mr different, you can go look for a eurosport cx500 or cx650 (basically a cx500 turbo chassis but without the turbo and the complex digital fuel injection) in a foreign country and then import it, but you wouldn't want to hipstergram mod it, just clean it up and ride it because it's a nice bike.
 

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I had my greasy hands on a 1995(?) R100R mystic and let it slip through my fingers!!!
Damn, I would have chopped that thing up and made me a beauty of a bike! Hated the plastics

An aircooled R is an aircooled R from the 75 to 100's with small changes in geometry. The frame and basic engine shape were all the same from 70's to 90's.

As stated above the GS models would suit a tall guy well, but the oilhead GS were better bikes.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
It's not a comprehensive list by any means, It's just that I have personal experience with all the bikes on that list, and I am a taller guy at 6'5 and 34" inseam. I'll be honest, though, I've owned and ridden smaller bikes like Cj360T, cb450, vespa T5, multiple honda dream 305's, Nortons, etc... and I fit fine enough to ride them in stock trim but if I had to look at myself riding one I'm sure I'd feel like a bear riding a tricycle, in fact that is why I have bought 3 different dreams - I love they way they look and ride, but everytime I ride one into town I feel like I'm pushing a moped. Those smaller bikes though, once you put a small seat, rearsets, and clipons on them, they can get pretty uncomfortable, which is why if you want to ride a sporting bike, the list you found is a good starting place. I am surprised I don't have airhead bmw's on there, but it's probably because I didn't have one at the time and now I do - although to be fair I do hate my airhead's current riding position because it has a corbin seat on it and it's just too low without rearsets, if it had the stock seat I might feel different because I could slide back in the seat a little, but the corbin has me locked in a little too forward. I may try one of those vietnam flat seats just to see if it fits better when I can slide back.

Don't rule out new bikes too, I go to dealerships all the time and just sit on motorcycles to see how they fit. I love V7 guzzi's but they are almost a solo bike for me because of how far I have to sit back on the seat. I loved the SCR950 (the bolt based scrambler) but hate the bolt because of the low seat. Speaking of Yamaha, V-max is a can't go wrong muscle bike, but the XSR900 fits me like a glove - a little tight but the right kind of tight. I love the way the new sportster roadster looks but I can't even stand to sit on one on the showroom floor, yet the Sporty Seventy-Two fits pretty well, esp with forward controls. I love the new Z900RS and Z900RS cafe and they fit great, but I can't ride the new ZX10R because I get hip cramps right off the bat. Triumph's Thruxton R fits so great I am thinking about buying one to match my Ducati Sport 1000, and most of everything in their bonneville line is great but I literally can't ride the Bonneville bobber because it hurts my back and it's uncomfortable to turn the bars while sitting like a dog trying to shit on the carpet.




It helps to fill out your location, because if you were close to me in Cbus, I'd say meet me at Iron Pony and we would just go through and sit on a dozen or so bikes just to get a feel for what you like and should like. If this is your first bike, there is nothing wrong with financing a new or newish used bike and riding that. It sounds all badass and heroic to be "tinkering" and riding, but really I am most happy when my bikes work and I can ride them and less so when they are broken. For tall guys where motorcycling presents some limited options It's nice to get out on a bike that works and to discover what you like about the hobby. A lot of tall guys I know get into adventure touring because those are tall heavy bikes and they can kind of do it all (although not all well) which lets you take trips, do some light off roading, lean it over hard in a turn, and basically get a sample of what the hobby has to offer before diving into having a sport bike or chopper, or an old nail you are restoring.


TL;DR version: the point is to sit on as many bikes as possible to see what you like and how you feel. Also talk to other tall riders to see what they like. This way when you go to look at an old bike you can get a feel for how you are going to like it.

Many thanks Geeto for all the info and taking the time to respond in that much detail. I have been looking hard for the past weeks and I think the BMW R100R (or R100RT) is really going to fit the bill. I have owned a few bikes, an SV 650, GSXR, and a few random others. I am not looking to slice and dice the bike to bits, but with that being said I am likely going to remove any of the fairings, nice flat long seat, and clean it up a bit for a "less is more" look. I love the look of the mono lever and I did see there is a nice little market of bolt on aftermarket cafe racer-esque parts that would allow me to do minor changes without a ton of time and expense. Along those lines, are there any differences between the R100R and the R100RT other than the large touring seat and the fairings/bags? I am assuming they both use the exact same tank, same frame, etc? Any thoughts here are appreciated - oh and I'm in Delaware, otherwise id be paying you a visit to pick your brain over a few Dogfish Head IPAs.
 

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If you are going to remove the fairing anyway the RT series is not what you want to buy, the fairing and aerodynamics is one of the bikes strongest selling features. RS series BMW's were designed for optimum 1 up riding and RT series models are better suited to 2-up riding. Both models were designed in a wind tunnel with that as the major criteria. You take my BMW K100RS and remove the fairing and you will succeed in making it slower and less ridable at high speed.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
If you are going to remove the fairing anyway the RT series is not what you want to buy, the fairing and aerodynamics is one of the bikes strongest selling features. RS series BMW's were designed for optimum 1 up riding and RT series models are better suited to 2-up riding. Both models were designed in a wind tunnel with that as the major criteria. You take my BMW K100RS and remove the fairing and you will succeed in making it slower and less ridable at high speed.
Good advice and thanks for that but I am not going to be touring this bike, just basically using it for cruising around town. As long as the frame and tank are exactly the same on the R and RT, that's my only concern at this point as that will give me the correct starting point if I decide to build it up custom. Can you verify that they indeed share those same two attributes?
 

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Good advice and thanks for that but I am not going to be touring this bike, just basically using it for cruising around town. As long as the frame and tank are exactly the same on the R and RT, that's my only concern at this point as that will give me the correct starting point if I decide to build it up custom. Can you verify that they indeed share those same two attributes?
They often put taller gearing on the RS versions to take advantage of the aerodynamics. With the R versions there we a lot more variations because they made them for a lot more years variations in rear linkage, mags or spokes, different brakes over the years but the machinery is all typically good on any BMW where the engine is longitudinally mounted. This one was a real hit on release, I know I wanted one and at the time considered it the cafe racer version:



all versions are currently difficult to source with modern high performance tires because of wheel sizes, that really limits their road performance capability. R versions are more prone to engine inertia then K (inline 3 or 4 cylinder) because on K bikes the transmission and alternator spin in the opposite direction to the crank. K bike is more like riding an engine with the rear wheel attached, R versions are more frame integrity dependent.

They all make for an awesome sidecar engine.
... add you can fit their brand name travel luggage on every model I know of.

I think the straight answer you are looking for is yes.
but the R100 was made for fewer years and not all concurrent to the RT100 production so slight variations will exist.
 

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Many thanks Geeto for all the info and taking the time to respond in that much detail. I have been looking hard for the past weeks and I think the BMW R100R (or R100RT) is really going to fit the bill. I have owned a few bikes, an SV 650, GSXR, and a few random others. I am not looking to slice and dice the bike to bits, but with that being said I am likely going to remove any of the fairings, nice flat long seat, and clean it up a bit for a "less is more" look. I love the look of the mono lever and I did see there is a nice little market of bolt on aftermarket cafe racer-esque parts that would allow me to do minor changes without a ton of time and expense. Along those lines, are there any differences between the R100R and the R100RT other than the large touring seat and the fairings/bags? I am assuming they both use the exact same tank, same frame, etc? Any thoughts here are appreciated - oh and I'm in Delaware, otherwise id be paying you a visit to pick your brain over a few Dogfish Head IPAs.

So let's talk airheads, and admittedly my knowledge is going to run out pretty quick. I owned a /5 for all of a minute 17 years ago, and have an 86 monolever now, and I have messed with a few belonging to friends. And that's about it.

So let's start with knowledge base, at some point you are going to run into Snowbum's chronicles. It is literally everything you have ever wanted to know about every single airhead bmw, written in this form of rigid stream of consciousness that only an engineer with borderline asperger syndrome could do (I kid, I am sure snowbum was perfectly fine - it's just A LOT of information): Snowbum, Snobum, free references & encyclopedia of BMW motorcycle repair information, Airheads, Oilheads, Classic K-bikes, prostate prostrate cancer facts

like seriously, a lot of information. I was reading several paragraphs yesterday on that site about the different bulbs that could be used in your instrument cluster for idiot lights and how the wrong one in the charging light could actually keep your bike from charging (have I mentioned germans are weird?). You should read through it...if you can.

The reason I like bmws, is that despite what hipster's think you need to do with a sawsall, you can actually build a great motorcycle with bolt ons. That means when they get valuable in the future (and they will), they can be put back to stock without major effort. The subframes are bolt on and off, so you can take all your stock parts off, put them in a tupperware tub, and have then for the next person.

Now, lets talk some of the bmw's you are talking about. First off the RT: If you goal is a naked bike I would NOT buy an RT to start with the intentions of removing the fairing. Why? Because it is a surprising amount of work to do it and everything in the bmw front ends are expensive. I think the only thing shared between a naked and RT bike are the forks and the wheels, the brakes are different, the headlight is different, and the gauge mounting bracket is different. Sourcing all those stock pieces is going to $100 you to death (fun fact: stock signal mounts for my R80 are usually $60-$100 a set used and require the forks to come off the bike to be installed). If you want a naked bike, start with a naked bike. Another fun fact I learned about them is that unless you want to get balls deep into rewiring the bike, the gauge cluster is kind of essential to the electrical system working. It's also a punch in the groin to service if you have an out bulb. So having the stock cluster on the much lower naked bike mount is preferable.

now let's talk the R100R. It is a good bike but it isn't without it's issues. All gen of bmw has some sort of issue you have to be mindful of, and with the r100r's from 1992-1995, it's the u-joint failure inherent to the paralever design that is troublesome. It's not as big a deal as the internet makes it out to be, and the failure rate is low, but just know that rear drive service and preventative maint is going to be higher than say an earlier monolever from 1986-1991. Not to say that the earlier monolever is perfect, they have transmission failures so you have to be mindful of those and be on the maintenance. The R100R subframe is unique to the R100R and has the rack built into it, which means it doesn't take the earlier seats like the monolevers do. I have complained about the corbin seat on mine before, and my plan this year with the bike is to mount a 1977-1984 flat seat on it so I can slide back, or maybe one of those made in vietnam seats - I just don't want to go lower because the knee and hip angle close up. If i were you, I would find out if the mounts for the R100R subframe are in the same location and spaced the same as the ones for the R80/100 monolever - because then you can just get a bolt on subframe (either bmw or aftermarket) and go nuts. I WOULD NOT cut and modify R100R subframe - the bikes are rare enough and so are the rear pieces. Honestly, since the bikes use the same seat pan from 1986-1996, I think you might be able to use a monolever subframe on it, but I would confirm just to make sure.

BTW, don't use the lame ass lazy "I am just cruising around town" excuse for anything. Here is the thing about bikes and motorcyclists - we always violate our own rules. "oh the bike doesn't need X because I am just going to be leisurely riding around town" except when you don't. Build the bike to suit your needs but can also stretch into you being on it a long time or riding it fast because you will do both those things at some point. this means your bike should have at very minimum Fenders (front and rear), ALL lights (yes even signals), good brakes (upgrade if you can), good suspension, and be well serviced. There is always going to be that day you pop down to the local bike night and then get on it while leaving, or run to the store for milk and end up running errands all over town for 8 hours. Things happen with bikes, and that's the point, we should want spontaneous adventure, just be prepared for it. I get that you don't feel like you need a fairing, but ride it first and see if you like it before you drag that old lazy saw of "it doesn't jive with my vision" or "I'm just cruising around town" out. the point is to be open minded about things and evaluate them on their practical merits, not aesthetics alone. Your bike should be comfortable, and sometimes that means a fairing and sometimes not.

here are some fun aftermarket parts links for you to look at:

https://texavina.com/monoshock-r65-r80-r80rt-r100rt-r100rs-1985-1996/
Welcome to
https://boxermetal.com/
????????
Home - FlatRacer.com - Classic Motorcycles & Cafe Racers parts and accessories
Down & Out Motorcycles | Bespoke Motorcycles - England

By the way, I am kind getting this vibe you have been spending too much time on places like BikeEXIF and may not get entirely some of the things we are trying to convey. Let's do it this way:

You don't want this :

bmw-r100-cafe-racer-ironwood-motorcycles.jpg

AS cool as this looks this is a mostly unrideable art project designed to sell parts and t-shirts. It maybe gets ridden a couple times a year short distances to some meetup, wow's everyone, and then goes home.

you want to get something closer to this:

Rispos-Siren-1.jpg

It has fenders, lights, mirrors, mufflers, a decent seat (could be a little taller for my taste), and all the things you need to ride the bike every day in traffic. Sure it probably has a custom handmade subframe or a hacked up original, but if you can figure out that the monolever one will fit, then you can just buy an aftermarket one with a similar seat from Down and Out.
 

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:| he probably does.

At some point you might as well just go buy a brand new R nine and modify it, that would end up more bike for cheaper.

the RNineT is a fantastic bike in it's own right. and really it's what every person looking at a bmw airhead as a fashion bike wants, whether they realize it or not, plus it works. the $15K price tag is a lot for some to hurdle though. I have to say, I am loving the new cafe racer version they have - maybe not as much as thruxton R but I would have to ride one to know for sure.

Maybe he does and maybe he doesn't. The only way to know for sure is to keep having a conversation, and the thing that drifts people away from the bad to the good is information. oh and posting pics of good custom bikes:

ss-6.jpg

custom-bmw-monolever-flat-racer-1.jpg

k-IMG_2246.JPG
8925024.jpg
 

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a 6-6 rider really is at a point where they simply need a larger motorcycle
that is in the ergonomics
sure you have extra tall racers in motogp and world supers etc
but race bikes have very high seats ,of course the main reason is the lean angle and the peg to seat distance must be reasonable and the lean angles dicrate very high mounted rider footpegs
my point in mentioniong that above is that having rider mounted higher up on a bike is not a bad thing ,in fact it is good in roadracing because the bike at speed in lean doesnt want to be leaning over it wants to stand up
a higher perched rider spends less energy keeping the machine in lean
a simple bit of modification on one of those airheads could make it fit the 6-6 rider
raise the tank and seat 2-3'' and back a bit
use a seat higher rider position in the foam
from there the readsets can be placed in accordance with fitting the rider
handlebar risers that move the base location forward are available

if done thoughtfully nobody will even notice the channge
its not rocket sciance
 

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Discussion Starter #20
So let's talk airheads, and admittedly my knowledge is going to run out pretty quick. I owned a /5 for all of a minute 17 years ago, and have an 86 monolever now, and I have messed with a few belonging to friends. And that's about it.

So let's start with knowledge base, at some point you are going to run into Snowbum's chronicles. It is literally everything you have ever wanted to know about every single airhead bmw, written in this form of rigid stream of consciousness that only an engineer with borderline asperger syndrome could do (I kid, I am sure snowbum was perfectly fine - it's just A LOT of information): Snowbum, Snobum, free references & encyclopedia of BMW motorcycle repair information, Airheads, Oilheads, Classic K-bikes, prostate prostrate cancer facts

like seriously, a lot of information. I was reading several paragraphs yesterday on that site about the different bulbs that could be used in your instrument cluster for idiot lights and how the wrong one in the charging light could actually keep your bike from charging (have I mentioned germans are weird?). You should read through it...if you can.

The reason I like bmws, is that despite what hipster's think you need to do with a sawsall, you can actually build a great motorcycle with bolt ons. That means when they get valuable in the future (and they will), they can be put back to stock without major effort. The subframes are bolt on and off, so you can take all your stock parts off, put them in a tupperware tub, and have then for the next person.

Now, lets talk some of the bmw's you are talking about. First off the RT: If you goal is a naked bike I would NOT buy an RT to start with the intentions of removing the fairing. Why? Because it is a surprising amount of work to do it and everything in the bmw front ends are expensive. I think the only thing shared between a naked and RT bike are the forks and the wheels, the brakes are different, the headlight is different, and the gauge mounting bracket is different. Sourcing all those stock pieces is going to $100 you to death (fun fact: stock signal mounts for my R80 are usually $60-$100 a set used and require the forks to come off the bike to be installed). If you want a naked bike, start with a naked bike. Another fun fact I learned about them is that unless you want to get balls deep into rewiring the bike, the gauge cluster is kind of essential to the electrical system working. It's also a punch in the groin to service if you have an out bulb. So having the stock cluster on the much lower naked bike mount is preferable.

now let's talk the R100R. It is a good bike but it isn't without it's issues. All gen of bmw has some sort of issue you have to be mindful of, and with the r100r's from 1992-1995, it's the u-joint failure inherent to the paralever design that is troublesome. It's not as big a deal as the internet makes it out to be, and the failure rate is low, but just know that rear drive service and preventative maint is going to be higher than say an earlier monolever from 1986-1991. Not to say that the earlier monolever is perfect, they have transmission failures so you have to be mindful of those and be on the maintenance. The R100R subframe is unique to the R100R and has the rack built into it, which means it doesn't take the earlier seats like the monolevers do. I have complained about the corbin seat on mine before, and my plan this year with the bike is to mount a 1977-1984 flat seat on it so I can slide back, or maybe one of those made in vietnam seats - I just don't want to go lower because the knee and hip angle close up. If i were you, I would find out if the mounts for the R100R subframe are in the same location and spaced the same as the ones for the R80/100 monolever - because then you can just get a bolt on subframe (either bmw or aftermarket) and go nuts. I WOULD NOT cut and modify R100R subframe - the bikes are rare enough and so are the rear pieces. Honestly, since the bikes use the same seat pan from 1986-1996, I think you might be able to use a monolever subframe on it, but I would confirm just to make sure.

BTW, don't use the lame ass lazy "I am just cruising around town" excuse for anything. Here is the thing about bikes and motorcyclists - we always violate our own rules. "oh the bike doesn't need X because I am just going to be leisurely riding around town" except when you don't. Build the bike to suit your needs but can also stretch into you being on it a long time or riding it fast because you will do both those things at some point. this means your bike should have at very minimum Fenders (front and rear), ALL lights (yes even signals), good brakes (upgrade if you can), good suspension, and be well serviced. There is always going to be that day you pop down to the local bike night and then get on it while leaving, or run to the store for milk and end up running errands all over town for 8 hours. Things happen with bikes, and that's the point, we should want spontaneous adventure, just be prepared for it. I get that you don't feel like you need a fairing, but ride it first and see if you like it before you drag that old lazy saw of "it doesn't jive with my vision" or "I'm just cruising around town" out. the point is to be open minded about things and evaluate them on their practical merits, not aesthetics alone. Your bike should be comfortable, and sometimes that means a fairing and sometimes not.

here are some fun aftermarket parts links for you to look at:

https://texavina.com/monoshock-r65-r80-r80rt-r100rt-r100rs-1985-1996/
Welcome to
https://boxermetal.com/
????????
Home - FlatRacer.com - Classic Motorcycles & Cafe Racers parts and accessories
Down & Out Motorcycles | Bespoke Motorcycles - England

By the way, I am kind getting this vibe you have been spending too much time on places like BikeEXIF and may not get entirely some of the things we are trying to convey. Let's do it this way:

You don't want this :

View attachment 96943

AS cool as this looks this is a mostly unrideable art project designed to sell parts and t-shirts. It maybe gets ridden a couple times a year short distances to some meetup, wow's everyone, and then goes home.

you want to get something closer to this:

View attachment 96945

It has fenders, lights, mirrors, mufflers, a decent seat (could be a little taller for my taste), and all the things you need to ride the bike every day in traffic. Sure it probably has a custom handmade subframe or a hacked up original, but if you can figure out that the monolever one will fit, then you can just buy an aftermarket one with a similar seat from Down and Out.

You are correct Geeto, I have been on such sites at BikeExif and others but simply to rule in AND rule out what I like and what I do not. I have finally decided on a 1986 R80, which I will be picking up next week. The current owner changed the handlebars, removed the fairings and, IMO, it is on its way to where I want to be without starting from scratch with a full fairing bike. The picture you posted just above this paragraph is exactly along the lines of the build I am looking to do, but with a taller seat and a few other mods. Do you have any suggestions on a brand or make of rear mono shock that would achieve the desired ride height of bringing up the back end?
 
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