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I'm pretty tall and this is the perfect bike for a tall guy. Half the money and the whole bike is still there. Even comes with soft luggage, bike cover and a matching Corbin backrest. :) Whats not to love. $2,400 CDN. That's like what? $1900 US. You'd have enough left to buy a cheaper chopped up not so good short rides only bike. Act now cuz it's goin fast hahaha. See what I did there? It is fast though...
View attachment 97005 View attachment 97005
And has a real frame, suspension, brakes, tires...
 

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To be fair, geeto appears to be shy at least one front brake calliper on his beemer :D that or he carries a spare disc with him everywhere he goes.
 

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Discussion Starter #43
Hahaha man you guys crack me up. I don’t even have the bike in my possession and you guys have already shit all over the bike, the seat, the subframe, the price I paid, why I should have paid $17.00 for a bone stock R80 instead, with fairings I would have to immediately remove and throw out anyway. What about the tires? Maybe the spark plugs? The grips?? I bet they are shit too.

I’ve never jumped into a bike build of this kind, so I am learning - hence the questions. For those of you that have offered some kind of helpful knowledge as a guide to what to potentially buy/upgrade first and constructive opinions and advice, many thanks.
 

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Perhaps money is not an issue to you. For most of us cost needs to be sensible, throwing out fairings is not, selling and using the money in the project is. You bought someones hack job and paid whole bike price. The seat, the sub frame are definitely an issue, at least for someone who does things properly. The price you paid is either the result of not knowing what you were buying or just wanting it and not giving a shit about the price. Either way it's about double what I see sitting there, worse if none of the original parts come with it or if the wiring harness is a rats nest. Tires may be alright, have you checked the date? How about the grips are they worn, sticky, crumbling? I always put in new plugs when I refurbish something.

You "jumped" into this and are learning and some of the things you'll learn will not be what you want to hear.
 

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OP, don't take it personal and bear with us for a moment to put yourself in the mind set of somebody who grew up in an era when 'building' a race inspired motorcycle did not involve hacking off as many major frame components as possible and need a flea-bay account to computer mail-order skate board seat LED bling lights that didn't even exist. Then maybe you can understand where some of the negativity is coming from.

Site probably needs a Chopper/Bobber area for the fenderless generation to post in :| Then we can all sit on the curb and wax poetic about powder coat paint and fat ass firestones punctuated by open triangles highlighting imaginary bone lines, without getting so many toes run over by the passing motorcycle racers.
 

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Hahaha man you guys crack me up. I don’t even have the bike in my possession and you guys have already shit all over the bike, the seat, the subframe, the price I paid, why I should have paid $17.00 for a bone stock R80 instead, with fairings I would have to immediately remove and throw out anyway. What about the tires? Maybe the spark plugs? The grips?? I bet they are shit too.

I’ve never jumped into a bike build of this kind, so I am learning - hence the questions. For those of you that have offered some kind of helpful knowledge as a guide to what to potentially buy/upgrade first and constructive opinions and advice, many thanks.
Le'ts re-frame the discussion: Why are you here? is it to learn and ask questions and solicit advice? or is it to get faint praise that validate your decisions even if they aren't the best decisions to be making because you want motivation? I imagine it is the former, but for some they don't realize it is the latter until they are in it and take criticism personally or to heart. Have some faith that when you start to do things right, the negativity will stop, but yeah you are getting a lot of negative now because you are doing or saying some things which many here from experience feel is unwise or unsafe.

I feel like maybe you are missing some context that those of us who play with very old motorcycles (and cars) have that you may not. Why are "original" vehciles more valuable generally than customs? the short answer is previous owners. With an original bike, even if time and entropy have taken their toll and warn out stuff - at the very least you can rely on the thing still working as engineered, and if it isn't the repair will often be as simple as following the service manual on diagnosing and replacing the broken parts. It makes working on stuff fairly easy. When something is modified, esp when it is modified poorly, the amount of work, expense, and time increase exponentially. Or in other words - the more the PO has fucked with something the more time time you are going to spend unfucking it.

In the case of your bike - you see a "vision" based on aesthetics and potential to lean, but most of us who have been down that road see a lot of work, and a lot of potential tasks that could have you swearing, cussing, and throwing money at fixes to the point where it might hurt your view on the hobby. Also let's face it there is some patently unsafe shit on that bike too. Trust me, every single person here wants you to have a positive and long lasting experience with this hobby, but everyone here winced a little when they saw that bike because for all the basic things you can see, we know there are at least 10 hiding. the road to hell is paved with good intentions.

Do I think you bought the right bike? well you wanted a project, and this certainly offered you one. The good news is that it runs so you can keep it running while you mod stuff (blowing a bike apart is a rookie mistake - the only reason you need to take a bike down to the frame is to paint the frame contrary to what bike shows on TV will tell you). the more important question is - are you happy with what you bought knowing that it is going to task you with a lot of things outside of your comfort zone. The answer should be yes. Personally you wanted a custom so yeah this is a pretty good starting place.

But what about the price? again are you happy with it? I know I wouldn't be in my market, but I don't know your market. I can tell you in ohio that bike is at best a $2500 motorcycle, but if we were back in Brooklyn I could see someone paying $4K like you did just out of convenience of it being there. his is somewhat of a Pandora's box: do you want to learn the lesson that you might have overpaid for a motorcycle and let your enthusiasm get the better of you? or do you want to just stay positive and soldier forward and chalk it up as the cost of an education? the choice is yours, the people here commenting want you to learn that lesson for 2 reasons: 1) because it lets them feel saavy about their own motorcycle buying while discouraging people to drive the prices up of bikes that aren't worth it; and 2) they genuinely do want you to learn something and motorcycle values, esp the volatility of old custom motorcycle values, are a hard lesson to learn. Some people are big fans of tough love (I know I am sometimes), take all this with a grain of salt and keep the forward path in view and it will be fine. Remember you learn more from a negative than positive, so even the shittiest joke has something to teach you.

I think I gave you some pretty sound advice on this stuff, and it has spurred some interesting conversations. But this shouldn't be your only echo chamber for what to do. ADVrider forum is a good forum for airheads, and while some of us are there as well, you'll find a whole host of other people who can help you as well with different experiences. The BMW MOA site and the airheads owners club have always helped me as well. You are going to take some shit from people who would encourage your to put the bike back to stock, that comes with the territory - just keep in the back of your mind: it's not personal and they think they are helping you, so why not try and understand why they are thinking they are helping you because that is the fruit of knowledge in the rind of bitter commentary.

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To be fair, geeto appears to be shy at least one front brake calliper on his beemer :D that or he carries a spare disc with him everywhere he goes.
yeah the caliper was sticking so I took it off to rebuild and am waiting on another crossover tube to come in. The great part about the stock chained caliper brake system is that naked R80's came single disc stock (dual was an option on the naked bike but standard on the RT) so I'm not out of braking expectations, and the hard line means I can take the second caliper off and stick a bleeder valve in the hole where it attaches and still ride the bike. It will probably be back on by the end of the month.

weird, the pic appears right side up on my phone and home computer but upside down on my work computer.
 

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... Plus you can remove the reflectors and polish or paint the lower fork legs while you are there ....
Make sure you put reflectors or tape back on if you ride in Ontario at night! By law even a bicycle requires the white/yellow reflective material on the front forks and red reflective material on the rear forks.
None of these blacked out bobbers would pass inspection in Ontario.
 

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Discussion Starter #51
Le'ts re-frame the discussion: Why are you here? is it to learn and ask questions and solicit advice? or is it to get faint praise that validate your decisions even if they aren't the best decisions to be making because you want motivation? I imagine it is the former, but for some they don't realize it is the latter until they are in it and take criticism personally or to heart. Have some faith that when you start to do things right, the negativity will stop, but yeah you are getting a lot of negative now because you are doing or saying some things which many here from experience feel is unwise or unsafe.

I feel like maybe you are missing some context that those of us who play with very old motorcycles (and cars) have that you may not. Why are "original" vehciles more valuable generally than customs? the short answer is previous owners. With an original bike, even if time and entropy have taken their toll and warn out stuff - at the very least you can rely on the thing still working as engineered, and if it isn't the repair will often be as simple as following the service manual on diagnosing and replacing the broken parts. It makes working on stuff fairly easy. When something is modified, esp when it is modified poorly, the amount of work, expense, and time increase exponentially. Or in other words - the more the PO has fucked with something the more time time you are going to spend unfucking it.

In the case of your bike - you see a "vision" based on aesthetics and potential to lean, but most of us who have been down that road see a lot of work, and a lot of potential tasks that could have you swearing, cussing, and throwing money at fixes to the point where it might hurt your view on the hobby. Also let's face it there is some patently unsafe shit on that bike too. Trust me, every single person here wants you to have a positive and long lasting experience with this hobby, but everyone here winced a little when they saw that bike because for all the basic things you can see, we know there are at least 10 hiding. the road to hell is paved with good intentions.

Do I think you bought the right bike? well you wanted a project, and this certainly offered you one. The good news is that it runs so you can keep it running while you mod stuff (blowing a bike apart is a rookie mistake - the only reason you need to take a bike down to the frame is to paint the frame contrary to what bike shows on TV will tell you). the more important question is - are you happy with what you bought knowing that it is going to task you with a lot of things outside of your comfort zone. The answer should be yes. Personally you wanted a custom so yeah this is a pretty good starting place.

But what about the price? again are you happy with it? I know I wouldn't be in my market, but I don't know your market. I can tell you in ohio that bike is at best a $2500 motorcycle, but if we were back in Brooklyn I could see someone paying $4K like you did just out of convenience of it being there. his is somewhat of a Pandora's box: do you want to learn the lesson that you might have overpaid for a motorcycle and let your enthusiasm get the better of you? or do you want to just stay positive and soldier forward and chalk it up as the cost of an education? the choice is yours, the people here commenting want you to learn that lesson for 2 reasons: 1) because it lets them feel saavy about their own motorcycle buying while discouraging people to drive the prices up of bikes that aren't worth it; and 2) they genuinely do want you to learn something and motorcycle values, esp the volatility of old custom motorcycle values, are a hard lesson to learn. Some people are big fans of tough love (I know I am sometimes), take all this with a grain of salt and keep the forward path in view and it will be fine. Remember you learn more from a negative than positive, so even the shittiest joke has something to teach you.

I think I gave you some pretty sound advice on this stuff, and it has spurred some interesting conversations. But this shouldn't be your only echo chamber for what to do. ADVrider forum is a good forum for airheads, and while some of us are there as well, you'll find a whole host of other people who can help you as well with different experiences. The BMW MOA site and the airheads owners club have always helped me as well. You are going to take some shit from people who would encourage your to put the bike back to stock, that comes with the territory - just keep in the back of your mind: it's not personal and they think they are helping you, so why not try and understand why they are thinking they are helping you because that is the fruit of knowledge in the rind of bitter commentary.

https://forums.bmwmoa.org/forumdisplay.php?13-Airheads
Home
https://advrider.com/f/forums/airheads.85/
Forums | Vintage BMW Motorcycle Owners
I came to the forum because I was interested in buying and building a cafe racer. I figured the CAFE RACER FORUM might be a good place to start and especially (and specifically) about how to best find and modify a bike to fit someone of my stature. I am not a 19 year old kid. I'm 39 years old and a have done 2 frame off restorations of CJ7s in my own garage and grew up working on vehicles with my own 2 hands. I'm not sure I understand the assumptions or the array of references about the age references that seem to stem from the "good ole boys" that seem to be rule the roost here but I digress...
As far as pricing, there are amazing modified custom airheads being sold by bike builders for close to $30K. Outrageous? Maybe, but if someone wants to pay that kind of scratch then good for them and kudos to the builders who can create a product that can command that pricing from a donor bike costing a few grand.

Anyway, moving forward I feel like I have enough information regarding the sub frame suggestions, and i'm sure the bike will have some surprises - or maybe not. Who knows if the previous owners chopped the wiring harness to bits or not, but I guess we will find out. I am still interested if anyone has ever installed a slightly longer mono shock as Geetos buddies at Down and Out emailed me in response to a question, and they informed me they are running a longer shock on the bike pictured on their website. I am still awaiting their response about details.
 

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You can't control the internet. The best you can hope for is to ask your question and sift through the flood and resultant wreckage of information that comes back. If you try to exert control, it slaps you.

I am a jeep guy too, and I have restored cars as well. I can tell you restoring and modifying an old bike is nothing like a car because cars move in 2 dimensions and bikes move in three. Things that are normal and an improvement on a car like lowering or lifting are twice as complex on a bike because it doesn't just change the stance, it changes the dynamics and stability. An unstable car, well you may spin out it may vibrate, it will scare you a little, but you are in a car. raising or lowering a bike where you start to get into unsafe trail numbers? eh that's your ass sliding down the street. With any change in ride height you are going to want to recalculate the rake and trail numbers to make sure you aren't going somewhere unsafe.

some other things that change in a bike that don't in a car:

- gear ratio changes when you lean the bike over because the tire diameter decreases.
- your wheelbase increases as the suspension compresses
- your suspension will actually become more rigid since bike suspension only works up and down, and at a 45 degree angle any bump is being deflected rather than absorbed. This is why some bikes have engineered flex in them while others just rely on sheer tire grip to settle after a bump mid turn.

best of luck
 

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Amazing to look or amazing to ride. I would bet that the hacked up bikes, cafe, scrambler, bobber, any of the grinder designs, regardless of how pretty, get ridden least. 10 years from now, those 30k BMW hackers with be virtually worthless.
 

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Sappin it up? I miss that stuff. When we had company over for a treat I'd break out the Canadian Whisky and go to the tree and get the "mix". Scoop of snow, 1 part whisky, 2 parts maple sap. Canadian Coolaid.
 

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I'm pretty tall and this is the perfect bike for a tall guy. Act now cuz it's goin fast hahaha. See what I did there? It is fast though...
View attachment 97005
Not fer nothin but I listed this bike and within days it was gone. Buyer was such a good guy, I dropped the price. It was more of an adoption than a sale. As we loaded it into his truck I knew it was going to a good home. Took the sting outta loosin it. Some younger folks still want a fast, functional, rideable bike and see the beauty in it. There is hope
 

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You build a bike for your audience, whether that is yourself or a client or a group of people you are looking to impress. Your audience determines how much praise they wish to heap on your creation.

This forum here is not so impressed with certain cosmetic changes especially ones that are done in spite of hurting the riding experience.


That's all...

New members tend to complain about how mean this forum is, rather than realize that the forum is not obliged to love everyone's creation.
 
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