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Discussion Starter #1
I had a very serious motorcycle crash on 4/30. Accelerated hard, hit big bump, violent tank slapper and ended up in the ditch.

Damage is compound fracture of lower right leg, broken left foot and ankle, 8 broke ribs with punctured lung and last but not least the right collarbone.

4 surgeries later I'm laid up in bed until at least July. Long term prognosis is pretty good though.

First question most people ask is whether I will ride again. I'm not sure how to answer that. Motorcycles and riding are a huge passion of mine. But I am seriously hurt as hell and I never want to go through this again.

Other problem is how much stress this has put (is putting) on the wife. I never want her to go through this again either.

I guess I'm looking for some people's experiences with situations like this.

Thank you.
 

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I said I wasn't going to after mine.

Mine was worse than yours by a wide margin (not bragging, just stating fact.)

Here I am.

Dumb? Probably. Also not married, though.
 

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Sorry to hear man, glad to hear you will recover!

My wife already knows that I will ride no matter what. With proper gear you greatly increase your odds of making it through an accident. I can only imagine what your family is going through, but I know that I wouldn't be able to stay out of the saddle long.
 

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I feel for you. I literally just got back on after my accident in 2004. I would get nervous even hearing bikes fly by on roads. Hands become sweaty, heart rate increases even flash backs of my accident. However learning about PTSD not only because of my accident but also the field I work in. I will give you the easiest and straight forward answer that was given to me. Either you can avoid it the rest
Of your life or face the fear. If you decide to face it. Take graduated steps. For instance, get on a bike and see how you feel. Then try driving a
Block. There are levels to accomplish to get you over any anxieties you may have. It may be beat for you to get on as fat as you can so the anxiety does not become overall life impacting too. If you want email me and I can help you out to my best ability. Also I am on my iPhone because on my computer it states my password is not correct which is weird cuz I never changed it. Any gramatical errors please over look
 

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I got lucky: July 3rd, 2004 I flat backed it on the highway at 65mph. Broken right collarbone and foot. Wife watched the whole thing from her car behind me before totaling her Toyota on the guardrail.

I tried to ride the bike home from the accident but the paramedics shoved me into an ambulance.

After I had some time I really thought about the hobby and if I would return but I really thought there was nothing else I liked better at the time. Wife and I had a long talk about it (she was girlfriend then) and eventually she came around and was pillion again, but she still refuses to ride herself in NYC. I have noticed she is kind of shell shocked from the accident, she gets anxiety now when I drive sporting when she used to think 4 wheel drifts on off ramps were fun.

Take some time, heal. Then force yourself to ride and see if you like it again. You are down for at least the rest of the season, so don't worry about whether you have to choose to ride again, but I will tell you this - if you are struggling with this then here is def a desire to ride that you can't hold back and will have to find another outlet for.
 

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My son crashed on 2-4-10 (car turned left at an intersection, son tried to avoid but couldn't, hit behind passenger side rear wheel) and broke both legs, both arms, spine @ C4, pelvis, both heels, and six fingers. Also lost his spleen. Last time I talked to him, he said he'd consider riding again. I don't know how I feel about this from a parental standpoint, but I completely understand from a motorcyclist's standpoint. I crashed at a trackday and broke six ribs, punctured a lung along with other associated maladies, and I declined the ambulance ride so I could get back to the pits and assess the bike and see if it could be fixed for the next session. The inability to breathe made me re-think my situation once I got there.

Moral of the story, if the fire burns hot enough you'll ride again, regardless of your current status and the impact it has on yourself and your loved ones.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Oh yah, I forgot to mention I was wearing gear. Full face helmet, armored jacket, gloves, and riding boots. I know that stuff saved me from greater injuries. Still not sure how I hurt my foot so bad in the boots though but they weren't a racing style boot.

Thanks for the replies so far.
 

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Life has risks. Riding motorcycles is one of the riskier things you can do. You are going to die one day. Do you want to spend your life on the side lines or are you willing to risk your neck to enjoy your hobby? Only you can answer that. But just like getting a tattoo, time heals all wounds and soon you'll forget just how much pain you're in right now. I love motorcycles but I hate all the traffic, congestion and general idiocy that surrounds where I happen to live. But even in the rural countryside you are not immune from others (or yourself!) Personally, I limit the amount of riding I do on the street and plan to get my jollies on the race track instead. On a race track I never have to worry about a truck turning left in front of me, I'm never more than a mile away from an ambulance and I'll be wearing superior personal protective equipment like full leathers, as opposed to the separate pants and jacket I wear on the street. Also, racing boots offer much better protection than street/touring boots but walking in them can be like wearing ski boots.
 

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I dumped once.
mostly road rash and a hurt shoulder but all and all not that bad.
Ive always thought about how hurt I would need to be to nor ride any more....I just dont know
 

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Every rider is going to crash one day, whether tipping it over in a parking lot due to an unseen oil slick or flipping head over heels over the guardrail. Hopefully you get back up. Your confidence will be dented but courage and the tenacity of the human spirit endures in the hearts of motorcyclists. Many who can still walk will decide to get back on the horse again, some sooner rather than later. It's won't be easy, but motorcycling can be like a bad habit to kick. Some are successful, others decidedly less so.
 

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I'm sorry to hear about your accident. The hardest part for me of getting back on a bike would be my wife. I had an accident before we met and was back on as soon as I was able. Now as much of a passion as it is for me and a part of me as it is the anxiety for her may not be worth it. That being said I think with time she could come to be okay with it and work through it. Honestly though personally I would hate if something happened and my wife had to spend the rest of her life changing my diapers because I got horribly banged up. Keep us updated on your progress
 

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Sorry to hear of your misfortune! Get well soon! I can tell you that when I first started riding I made a rookie mistake and looked at a pile of gravel as I was turning. I hit said pile and the front end washed out from under me. I recall flying Superman style over the bars watching the instrument cluster disappear between my legs. While I had the gear on my jacket rolled up my arms while I slid on the asphalt griding a nice hole through my elbow. I bled a bit and wrestled my bike back up and rode home with quite an adrenaline rush. After I got back I called my dad and told him I wiped out and that I'd never ride again. His words were "wait until tomorrow and you'll change your mind". Granted, I wasn't nearly as banged up but it shook me up as a new rider. This was back in 1997. I am riding today now with my wife (she got her endorsement last fall) and while I am very concerned for our safety, I just can't seem to quit. Whatever you decide for yourself and your family will be the right decision. Think of the Top Gun pep talk scene....LOL!
 

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Took a couple of offs in the eighties and thought about giving up. Got chased one night by a guy in a big 'ol Buick. Got away through some subdivisions and made into the garage. Went in the house shakin' like a leaf. My wife asked me what was wrong, so I explained what happened. She said, and I quote, "Why don't you just go racing and avoid all this grief?."

Been racing since, with very few road miles on my street machines each year. Between all three, there won't be 400 miles this year.
At the track there are no cars, no cops, no dogs, no trucks, no traffic lights, no speed limits, and if you do fall, it is usually in a corner without anything to hit as you slide. There is also an ambulance on duty with qualified people to aid you if needed. You will also meet the greatest people in the world.
Give it a try. I don't foresee myself giving it up soon. I'll be 59 in December.

Gordon Hamilton
AHRMA #58r
 

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It sucks that you got hurt, and I hope you get better soon and that you get back on the bike.

When I was much younger (7-10 years ago) I had a run of crashes, just trying to ride fast on the streets. Mostly lowsides into ditches but I never got hurt, lets just say that I filled my bag of experience before my bag of luck emptied.

It sounds to me (and don't take this the wrong way, according to your description) like this was not an accident by definition. It sounds to me like you made some bad decisions on the bike that led to the crash. What you have to figure out before you get back on is:

1. Clearly understand the situation you were in and the conditions that surrounded you.
2. Know what inputs you gave the bike.
3. Understand what those inputs made the bike do and why that caused you to crash.
4. Think of what you could have done differently to successfully have negotiated the situation you were in.

What you have to remember in a single motorcycle accident is that the bike didn't "DO" anything inputs you gave the bike caused the crash to happen.

The last question you have to ask yourself is, do I trust myself to not make the same mistake again?

Feel better and I hope your back out on two soon!
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Thanks for all the well wishes everyone.

I just wish I had a steering damper on my bike. I think that would have saved my ass.
 

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i dont think a steering dampner would have helped as much as you think it would..... sometimes they will cause a situation rather than prevent one

my story.... my last crash on the street... i was hit from behind while i was waiting to take a left hand turn... the guy was not paying... i was at a complete stop, turn signal on.. still was catapulted off my bike... and yes my pregnant wife was two cars behind me... saw the whole thing

i still do not ride on the street... dont even own a streetbike. but... that was 2002 and i have been racing motorbikes ever since... way safer on the track
 

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Sorry about the crash but glad the prognosis is positive. I had pretty much the same reaction as Matt after a nasty crash in '85. I wanted no part of the street, put my remaining street bike in storage and after about a year started riding dirt bikes then racing enduros and hare scrambles. Did that until the early 90s then quit altogether.

Started up again about 6 years ago after meeting a new co-worker with a bike. Pulled the bike out of storage and rode a lot on the street for a couple of years then started vintage road racing. I just sold my only street bike. I'll probably get something vintage for the street but racing with these loonies is my main fix now. Racing is much safer.
 

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Wrecked my 1100e through the lights @Cordova two weeks after graduating high school 1988. Pretty much wrecked everything I sat on in those days. Never bothered me, still think back and grin.

The last year I raced cars regularly was involved in some bad ones, caught up in other people's shit. Twice I was scared in the car, never happened before or since. One will be with me forever, or at least until I'm in a bigger wreck that makes that one seem tame.

When I started riding bikes again rode dirt for a few years before I got a street bike. Even after I got a couple street bikes barely rode them. Got sort of burned out on all the local dirt spots, some wrong things happened with the local hare scramble sanctioning body, started riding street more.

If I had more feasible roadracing options or a better selection of offroad areas I'd only ride street to get to and fro work.

You have time to heal and think about what you want to do. May find that a year or so off will make it clearer. There have been things I've agonized over, only to find I didn't miss them a bit once they were gone or I didn't do that anymore.

Thing is you should ride again because you want to ride again, not to prove anything or because you feel obligated.
 
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