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Wonder what they will sell for.
super cool bikes with some interesting parts on them
 

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image.jpg

The plates say it all. Unfortunately these two pieces of history would probably require at minimum $10,000 a piece to do correctly........if you practically did most of the work yourself. I'm guessing he wants $7000 for both.
 

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I don't know about $10K, but it wouldn't be a $1000 refresh either.

The rare stuff is in good enough shape and the bikes are complete.

I am completely cheesed off that "Cafe 1" used stock cb750 shocks considering how much money went into other things (morris wheels, plastic bodywork, etc....) .

"Cafe 2" has all the external parts to be a real dunstall but Paul used to retitle the bikes he built. If I had to guess the bike was built by a Dunstall parts distributor as a showcase bike or someone who wanted a dunstall but couldn't get one imported from england.
 

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I might run up to Thousand Oaks just to take a peak at these. You could get them up and clean for under 10K however to do them correctly you would need more. Heck the exhaust (unless you go with a mac) and the suspension will take $2500 right there...........let alone the everything else. I feel these need to be done correctly and period specific.......all of which means big $.



Screenshot_2015-03-26-09-43-24.png

Not mine
 

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how do you get to $2500 in the suspension? not being argumentative just want to see where that number came from. Both these bikes have stock cb750 forks with dual disc conversions and stock rear shocks. Assuming you go for just replacement we are talking maybe at most $700 for ohlins rear shocks (although $200 hagons or rebuilding a vintage set would be far cheaper and more correct) and maybe $200 in emulators, fluid and fork seals. maybe if you were paying someone else's labor for everything it is $2500. Proper correct finishes would not be polishing or powder coating but painted clear coat so I guess it is all a matter if you want accurate or super shiny. I do my own polishing and sand blasting anyway so even if that was a cost it wouldn't be a cost to me or most people who restore.

Dunstall exhausts came either painted or chrome and it is the head pipe and the merge collector that are the rare bits - the silencers are available new as replicas and if you hunt around nice used ones or NOS originals.
 

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The plates say it all. Unfortunately these two pieces of history would probably require at minimum $10,000 a piece to do correctly........if you practically did most of the work yourself. I'm guessing he wants $7000 for both.
I like them just in their faded, busted ass, glory.

Personally I'd punch out some GPR copies of the bodywork to sell, hoping the hipsters get hip to it all. Or just hang the plates on the wall and hide the bikes someawheres for maybe fifty years.

I guess someone could resto them to death, and sell them to a collector for a healthy profit. It's strange that these two are period correct and the current café racer clowns would walk straight past them to gawp at a Bratty CB350 in patina, brown and brass.

But then again, I'm more into healthy, than profit.

Danger, is my business."
 

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I agree.......the current "cut em up cafe" crowd would pass these up for a brat, flash rusted, race number 1, big wheeled, cb350 that would be unsafe to ride.

If you get replicas of exhaust and such you could do it for less however...........if I could find an authentic Dunstall exhaust I'm sure it would need chrome plating and repairing and if not it would be well over $1000. If you went NOS exhaust....well you know.....at least $1500. I would guesstimate that rebuilding original shocks with the chrome plating and finishing would be $500. Even a good pair of Yss would be over $500 (something that looked period race). I like Yss.

By the condition of these machines I would say that the stanchions are so pitted in that specific spot I could probably break them over my knee. So that cost, springs, seals, boots, etc, etc..........I can easily see $2500 if not more.

And I don't feel polishing tubes and such give it that original appearance. But I know it is about the best I could do if not sourcing NOS which would be another raping.

I am not a professional restorer but I have been humped by professional restoring. Just my thoughts and math.
 

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It's strange that these two are period correct and the current café racer clowns would walk straight past them to gawp at a Bratty CB350 in patina, brown and brass.
This is why I think the new "custom" bikes need their own name instead of trading off of caferacers or the brat style of one custom house in japan whose bikes look nothing like whatever the hell is called "brat" these days. I think someone suggested "mobster" and that name blows too.

I used to suggest "Sport Chopper" which I thought was pretty accurate, but in true douchebag form I think that was rejected because it ties them back to easter egg style OCC choppers.
 

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That stuff is fugly
Tastes change, and lets face it people just don't take recreational drugs and do stuff anymore. Either they stopped taking drugs or the drugs got so much better that all people who take them want to do is sit on the couch and watch a 13 hour marathon of breaking bad.
 

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I can speak to the cost of building / restoring a Dunstall Honda today. Yes it was expensive but not what has been stated here. There are still nos Dunstall parts around as they were expensive in the 70s and not that popular. The Dunstall name trumped the popularity of the actual bikes. It still does today. Some see original Dunstall and think $$$$ but in reality the stuff was built for a niche market in the 70s and it is traded in an even smaller niche market today. As was stated the Dunstall parts look too big for the bike today. The Dunstall Honda does not photograph well. It looks much better and more balanced in person than in pictures. The fairing is not actually huge but fits the width of the motor and provides nice protection for the rider. That's the other part of Dunstall that is misunderstood today; these were built as street bikes not race bikes. A large fairing / windscreen provides nice protection for a rider from wind. The Dunstall Honda isn't for everyone. There were racier options for converting a CB750 like Rickman, Seeley, and Bimota. But if the Dunstall Honda speaks to you then its appeal is instantaneous.

Here's mine
HPIM3111.jpg

And with a rider the fairing doesn't look so huge
Dunstall.jpg

Scott
 
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