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Discussion Starter #1
i've got a brand new bt45 front that's been sitting in may garage for three years. the only signs that it isn't new is that the top surface of the tread is a little hard.

is there a was to treat the surface to freshen it up? or is it a bad idea to use it at all?
 

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Well, since they're easy to mount up....
Run it. Was it sitting in the sun? That'll beat the crap out of tires.

Or buy a new one, they're pretty cheap.
 

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theres a date stamped on the side of it. if its more than 3 years old, you might want to think about getting rid of it. after having a 5 year old tire on your streetbike, youll start worrying about it. id mounti it up, but replace it as soon as you have the 100 bucks to pick up anew one. especially if what you have is looking really dangerous. i know the rule of thumb we always went by was 3 years old, its junk. but we left ourselves a bit of room. i toss race tires after 3 years usually. even if they have tread. although, chris marshalls racebike, the one i rode all of the year before last, and the one he won both races at beaver on this past event (yes, he won f-500, v1, and 350 overall!) has 7 year old dunlops on it! he said it was starting to slide around a little. i never had any issues with it at summit or vir.


you can always use armor all.

ok, well, definitely dont do that.


jc
 

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Discussion Starter #4
it sat in a garage this whole time, and i'm just planning on using it on the street. i guess i'll buy a matching rear and compare the feel of the rubber to see how different they are.
 

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Grinding circle track tires is a common thing. We use super aggressive wheels especially designed for tire grinding to open them up and get to fresh rubber. On a bike tire I would probably use 36 grit on a hand pad so you don't screw up the profile. I'd bet if you had a durometer the newly exposed rubber will be just as soft as a new tire since it hasn't been through any heat cycles. I've never been able to find anyone that admits to knowing anything about softening bike tires, but it's done in all other forms of motorsports so.... Make friends with a successful kart racer, they're the kings of glueing tires.
 

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toche!

I agree and I am trying to count how many side splitting laughs I've had reading rabid sky is falling posts about how life threatening dangerous it is merely to grind 1/8" of never used sidewall edge off a high grade street motorcycle tire

I mean if you cut it too deep and it's guts say hello....... ya may have a problem but other than that

grind away or take that aged tire and do some burnouts with it

good horse and a half angle grinder with a sanding disc will make short and accurate work of it as long as you are NOT(edit) mostly mongloid
 

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I'm currently looking into new tires for my bike. I heard about the tire date code from the parts guy and he indicated they used a 6 year time frame for tires. I'm still mulling over the metric tire sizes to compare with the ones I have on now - my current tires are well over 6 years old.
 

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Had my Chevelle out yesterday. It has 4-5 year old Hoosier Quick Time Pros on the rear. Just screwing around pulled in a parking lot and did some doughnuts. It'll go around about three times before the tires get enough heat in them to shove the nose. Get done and there's a film of grainy like rubber over the lot, a good sign the tires are old because the rubber's not sticking to itself. After that straight line traction was night and day better.
 
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