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I want to torque the base nuts on my MT125 to Spec. They are far into the barrels, and you can't get a socket over them, and the fins are blocking any access except with a box wrench. I went to sears and bought 3/8 inch socket type "crows" feet open ends, but even these have the hole for the socket too far in to be able to attach a torque wrench.

Are there box wrenches made that will attach to a torque wrench and have a 1.25-1.5 inch extension on them to be able to get into a hard to reach spot?
 

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Evil,
I know Yannerilla has had similar issues getting to his, not sure how he solved it though. Worst case scenario you get a decent fish scale, hook it to the end of the box end wrench, do a little math and torque with the scale.
You'd have to do the math anyway with any type of length extension hooked up to a torque wrench because it will throw the readings off.
JohnnyB

PS...or you come with with a combination of stuff that will work and cut and weld to make your own tool. I've done that before.
 

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Evil,
I know Yannerilla has had similar issues getting to his, not sure how he solved it though. Worst case scenario you get a decent fish scale, hook it to the end of the box end wrench, do a little math and torque with the scale.
You'd have to do the math anyway with any type of length extension hooked up to a torque wrench because it will throw the readings off.
JohnnyB

PS...or you come with with a combination of stuff that will work and cut and weld to make your own tool. I've done that before.
 

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We've got some U-shaped torque wrench extensions for doing tractor heads. Have a box end, stick straight out however far they need to to clear the side, ninety degree bend up far enough to get above the head, and then another ninety back in where the torque wrench attaches. That way you are still torgueing directly over the stud and settings don't change.

Get ya a cheap box end, heat it up and bend it however it has to be to clear and then weld on a socket for the torque wrench to attach to. The only thing critical is to get the box end and the socket lined up. It can look like anything between those two points.
 

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We've got some U-shaped torque wrench extensions for doing tractor heads. Have a box end, stick straight out however far they need to to clear the side, ninety degree bend up far enough to get above the head, and then another ninety back in where the torque wrench attaches. That way you are still torgueing directly over the stud and settings don't change.

Get ya a cheap box end, heat it up and bend it however it has to be to clear and then weld on a socket for the torque wrench to attach to. The only thing critical is to get the box end and the socket lined up. It can look like anything between those two points.
 

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Evil,
there are things called 'break over' torque wrenches, pre-set or adj ?..it's like an open end wrench that breaks 45^ at the torque setting....probably only cost a couple bucks...hea, hea..

dch
 

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Evil,
there are things called 'break over' torque wrenches, pre-set or adj ?..it's like an open end wrench that breaks 45^ at the torque setting....probably only cost a couple bucks...hea, hea..

dch
 

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my guess is if you didn't have them bored using torque plates and confirmed at what exact torque setting they are perfectly round and even use the same torque wrench to do the install

a common sense goodntite with a reasonably calibrated hamfist will probably work nearly as well as a miracle
 

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my guess is if you didn't have them bored using torque plates and confirmed at what exact torque setting they are perfectly round and even use the same torque wrench to do the install

a common sense goodntite with a reasonably calibrated hamfist will probably work nearly as well as a miracle
 

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Hack,
He should have mentioned it's a MT125"R", factory production race bike. He probably should at least attempt to use a torque wrench in some capacity as they tend to be a bit more sensitive to such things than a street bike.
JohnnyB
 

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Hey Evil -

Both K&L and Sudco have the tool you need, but it's just as easy to make one. It's just a box wrench cut in half with a socket welded to it so you can use it on your torque wrench. Exact length not critical, but shorter is better than longer. You can either use it pointed straight away from the end of the torque wrench and use math to tell you the reduced torque reading necessary due to the increased lever arm, or do it the no math easy way.

Turn the adaptor 90 degrees so it and the torque wrench make an "L". Torque away with the standard reading - it'll be correct.

That's SOP on head torque for pretty much all modern Ducatis.
You can only get a very thin box wrench on the head nuts.

Michael
 

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oh.......... well I'd tighten it a bit more then ;)
 

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I find a torque wrench indespensable building a race engine. Things like torquing the center four head bolts on a Honda twin about 2 ft/bls more than the outside bolts. Torquing all the case cover screws to 8 ft/lbs instead of 6. And torquing the crap out of the superbolts I use in place of stock main bearing bolts.

Watch stock bolts at stock torque stretch enough to allow main bearing outer races to have .030" end play in the saddles after a race at 12,000 rpm and you become a believer in taking those extra steps.

Not to mention torquing the primary drive gear nut and clutch hub bolts. One of the major differences between a race engine and a street engine is the care taken during assembly.
JohnnyB
 

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ok, before you go and get the impression that I am a complete barbarian in need of a good stern talking to about this stuff......... ;)

I was ASE certified master 20 years ago

I own 18 torque wrenches of various designs

and have owned, built, and wrenched on tons of thoroughbred engines

including highly strung Italian and German V12's


I even own calibration equipment and I can tell you I've never had a tool truck guy that owned his own and could check my torque wrenches without having to send them off

and of all the world class technicians I have worked beside

I've yet to check a single one's torque wrench that was spot on accurate and many fail to even store the spring loaded click type correctly which puts them far out of whack with a quickness, seen more than I can count that needed a new spring and other parts just to be calibrate-able



I don't get nearly as anally bent as I used to about minutia but I do have great respect for a well calibrated torque wrench and properly torquing fasteners

try doing a GM 440T4 Transmission without a good one

some fasteners clamp 7 layers of cast and machined billet aluminum and will really wreck your week if you don't nail it


I guess I should get off my butt and upload onto my domain at least the last 8 years gearheading mayhem stored in digital form on a few hard drives

but I did run across some really good pix of HiPo honda stuff last night including a CB head fully prepped by Yoshimira

no idea why I sold all that stuff but CB750 engines are just too heavy to suit me and for their power potential

so anyhow, I promise I'm not ham fisted boor

but it does amaze me that I've managed to screw together a Tourbillon that worked just fine afterwards, talk about high performance metal, and strictly all by feel

peace out and wish you the best with those fasteners
 

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At one time I found a list of torquing accuracies based on the type of wrench used, compared to hand torquing.
The absolutely best wrenches you could get averaged around 2.5% of the reading, down to deflecting beam type that were around 15% off, down to hand torquing that was off by 30%. It was an SAE paper of some sort, using bolt stretch to determine actual torque applied between the head and the threads.

You can build a pretty simple device to test torque wrench accuracy. Course that really doesn't tell you much...friction at the bolt head, threads etc. vary so much you'll be lucky to be within 20%.

Building race engines you want one thing more than anything else. Consistancy between builds. So the actual torque reading is not nearly as important to me as is knowing that this engine is torqued as close as possible to the same as the last engine which didn't blow up.

I ain't got no certifications....only championships :) But the guy that works on my truck at the dealer has certifications and he only had to replace my backup light switch 3 times before he got it right :)
Calm down...it's a joke :)
JohnnyB
 

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normally it takes about six stabs for me to get a tail light bulb replaced and working without melting the harness

your guy sounds like he's on the very top of his game or has a better bulb hammer!

I agree with everything you are saying, one hundred percent
 

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Well, I gotta admit...I don't even know where the backup light switch is, and it's been working longer now that it ever did before. (I think it's on the gearbox somewhere).

I do have a good friend that is a "technician" at a local Jag dealership, has worked for Ford also. The guy knows his shit, these new cars are like airplanes. He builds muscle cars in his spare time and knows modern car computers inside and out.

Actually, I feel for the dealership wrenches these days. They spend most of their time fixing problems that originated at the factory and then guys like me shit on them anyway :)
JohnnyB
 
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