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Discussion Starter #1
Well am I crazy. I'm turning my old 74' Suzuki TS250 into a cafe racer. Why an old 250 enduro you ask. Because I already have it and I'm bored. I've always been intrested in cafe bikes but I'm not rich enough to buy a proper bike to build, besides I like the challenge. Are there any other younger people on here. When I talk to people my age a lot of them have no idea what a cafe bike is. I'll post some pics a little later.
 

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Younger than what? I don't know many people my age who know what a cafe bike is.
 

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Sorry,I'm almost double your age.

Cafe bikes seem to be getting more popular(even some factory new retro ie. Ducati),so the more they show up at rides,shows and on the street more of the younger crowd will be exposed to them.

I have a Suzuki TS185 enduro that's pretty much complete sitting behind my garage,but I think I will rebuild it back as a dirt/play bike. I also have a TC125,but it's pretty well gone and for parts only.

BTW Pirelli makes their bias ply Sport Demon tires in a huge selection of sizes. I'm sure you could find a set to fit your bike,unless you have a 21" front or something. They are great tires and I have them on my wifes Ninja 250. They stick and wear well and provide pretty good feedback.




Edited by - coolatula on Oct 21 2007 08:42:45 AM
 

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Discussion Starter #6
OK finally some pics. First ones are its original state, then the first paint job I gave it, then its current state. I've owned this bike since I was 12. I used to take it off road all the time, but I dont have anywhere I can do that anymore.





















Edited by - oldTS on Oct 21 2007 12:09:04 PM

Edited by - oldTS on Oct 21 2007 12:09:31 PM
 

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Discussion Starter #7
OK, another update. I was working on it today. The bottom pic is a rendering of what I want the seat to look like.









Edited by - oldTS on Oct 21 2007 9:37:47 PM

Edited by - oldTS on Oct 21 2007 9:38:53 PM
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Edited by - oldTS on Oct 21 2007 9:41:24 PM

Edited by - oldTS on Oct 21 2007 9:43:33 PM
 

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Old dual-purpose bikes have plenty of cafe potential. Along with all the usual cafe modifications, you just need to put on a smaller front rim. And please buy this fuel tank from Airtech:

 

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I've got an old 72 ts90 and the tank is a perfect old cafe tank it's sweet! it would look good on that thing

carpe diem.... seize the carp
 

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Discussion Starter #10
quote:
Old dual-purpose bikes have plenty of cafe potential. Along with all the usual cafe modifications, you just need to put on a smaller front rim. And please buy this fuel tank from Airtech:

Thanks for the suggestion but the price tag is a little high for me. At this point in time I have many other projects in the works, this is the budget one. This is so I can work on something while I'm waiting to save money for my Ranger (new transmission), or classic Mustang (complete restoration). Starting off with my bike as it was, I have only spent $20.00 on metal and a fork seal. The goal is to build it for as cheap as possible. Someday I would like to spend the money and build something like a Suzuki GT750.
 

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Fill out your Bio!!!!
I guess I'm feeling a little hateful tonight. If you are needing to do this project cheap, then you may need some help and stuff from the guys here if they are close to you. For instance, it was recommended that you put a smaller rim on the front. I agree and have a complete Honda CB350 front wheel with brake that I could give you if you were anywhere near me and wanted it. I even have a complete Honda 350 front fork assembly with new fork seals and oil that could be available. Kinda makes you wish you had filled out your bio now, huh? I'll bet other people on here have old stuff too.

I know all about needing to stay within a minimal to non existent budget. It can suck but if you have some time and parts it can be done. Do you have a salvage yard near you? Sometimes when I have made mongrels like this I try to stay within the same brand, in this case Suzuki. I think that Suzuki made a TM250 that was a motocrosser that had down pipe and a differently ported cylinder. If you couldfind some of those parts it would be cool.

I think it is a cool project that has potential.

Ken


AHRMA 412
Vintage racing - old guys on old bikes
 

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i'd hold off on fabbing the seat till you drop the front end and put shorter rear shocks on it because the angle of your seat is going to change and may not have the lines you intended.

...connoisseur of slack...
 

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quote:
i'd hold off on fabbing the seat till you drop the front end and put shorter rear shocks on it because the angle of your seat is going to change and may not have the lines you intended.
excellent point. same goes tank changes too.

"Society is like a stew. If you don't keep it stirred up, you get a lot of scum on top." -Edward Abbey
 

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Discussion Starter #14
OK I filled out my Bio. Yes the TS250 is the street version of the TM250. I love the under slung exhaust but I have already figured out and designed my own. I have to weld it up. It would be cool if I could find the jug from a TM. I used to own a 72 TS400, it was a pile. I was planning on building the motor and putting it in my 250 frame but there just weren’t enough parts about for it. I bought it for $25 so no big loss, but it would have been sweet. I had a TM400 crank for it. I've heard the TM400 was an uncontrollable terror because of the unpredictable power curve. But using mechanics from the TM400 and the electrical from the TS would have fixed that.
 

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quote:
Well am I crazy. I'm turning my old 74' Suzuki TS250 into a cafe racer. Why an old 250 enduro you ask. Because I already have it and I'm bored. I've always been intrested in cafe bikes but I'm not rich enough to buy a proper bike to build, besides I like the challenge. Are there any other younger people on here. When I talk to people my age a lot of them have no idea what a cafe bike is. I'll post some pics a little later.
I'm 21, bike looks good.

--------------------------

1978 Yamaha XS400. Stock for now.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I am a bit new to building a cafe bike, but remind me again why I want a smaller front wheel?
 

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OldTS,
You want a smaller front wheel so you can get better tire selection. In addition it will steer quicker and if you go with a streetbike wheel you will get a bigger brake for better stopping. I agree that you might want to save the seat fab until you have the chassis set up the way you want. I would not go for shorter shocks since that would kick the front rake out even farther. I would leave them stock for now until you get your pipe routed and the front end set. Then you can make final adjustment by changing the shock length.
I really want to make a cafe bike out of one of the big 2 stroke enduros like the TS400 or the DT400 although the Kawi 350 Bighorn would be cool too with the rotary valve and a big old Mikuni hanging out right side of the engine.
Now that you have filled out the Bio, my smartmouth comments about your location can bear some fruit. I am in Alaska. Not much good for you (or anyone else). However, all of my bikes and parts are in (you guessed it), Wisconsin. My cottage and garage are just north of Menomonie, west of Eau Claire. If you can wait until Christmas time I can give you a complete front end including wheel for a CB350. In the meantime you can continue fabbing up what you have and making some rearsets and stuff.

Cool how this internet stuff works.
Ken

AHRMA 412
Vintage racing - old guys on old bikes
 

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quote:
I am a bit new to building a cafe bike, but remind me again why I want a smaller front wheel?
Well,two benefits right off the bat are..one better/quicker turn in and two better tire selection. Plus you'll need a much bigger front hub/brake anyway,so you might as well just go with a street based wheel from the start and kill two birds with one stone.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
quote:
OldTS,
You want a smaller front wheel so you can get better tire selection. In addition it will steer quicker and if you go with a streetbike wheel you will get a bigger brake for better stopping. I agree that you might want to save the seat fab until you have the chassis set up the way you want. I would not go for shorter shocks since that would kick the front rake out even farther. I would leave them stock for now until you get your pipe routed and the front end set. Then you can make final adjustment by changing the shock length.
I really want to make a cafe bike out of one of the big 2 stroke enduros like the TS400 or the DT400 although the Kawi 350 Bighorn would be cool too with the rotary valve and a big old Mikuni hanging out right side of the engine.
Now that you have filled out the Bio, my smartmouth comments about your location can bear some fruit. I am in Alaska. Not much good for you (or anyone else). However, all of my bikes and parts are in (you guessed it), Wisconsin. My cottage and garage are just north of Menomonie, west of Eau Claire. If you can wait until Christmas time I can give you a complete front end including wheel for a CB350. In the meantime you can continue fabbing up what you have and making some rearsets and stuff.

Cool how this internet stuff works.
Ken

AHRMA 412
Vintage racing - old guys on old bikes

Wow, thats kinda funny, I have friends in Menomonie and Eau Claire. My brother has a DT400 but he's keeping it stock. Another question, what kind of handle bars are a good choice for the vintage look?
 
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