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Hi guys,

I am currently trying to transition my stock 1990 gn250 into a brat bike, i do like the look of the bulky front tyres however am not willing to risk safety. I would like a tyre that could be ridden fairly comfortably both on and off-road, however, leaning more so to one side for the scale is not the end of the world. I have been read that shinko e240s and avon safety mileage mkII's arent the greatest when it comes to safety; can anyone shed some light on this?
i would like a 4.00 or 5.00 rear (or something similar) and probably a 3.00-4.00 front.

I know this probably isn't the most useful info to go off but would anyone have any recommendations?
Thanks.
 

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The tyres that come as standard on the ducati scamblers are good on road and off road.

They use pirelli MT60s
 

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He said Brat bike not Dirt bike. We don't do Brat bikes here, this is a cafe racer place, heck I don't even know what a Brat bike is, but I know what a Brat is and it's not good.

Putting a bigger heavier front tire on your bike then it was ever designed to run is a great way to induce head shake and wheel wobble on a motorcycle that has very limited rigidity to the front end to start with.
 

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We don't do Brat bikes here, this is a cafe racer place.
Apparently, brat bikes are also considered to be cafe racers - which is probably why the OP is here.

Found this online: A brat style bike is difficult to distinguish from a traditional café racer style bike, because they look very similar. ... They were born in Japan and are shorter, more aggressive and use a flat seat (without the rear hump or cowl of a café racer)
 

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Apparently, brat bikes are also considered to be cafe racers - which is probably why the OP is here.

Found this online: A brat style bike is difficult to distinguish from a traditional café racer style bike, because they look very similar. ... They were born in Japan and are shorter, more aggressive and use a flat seat (without the rear hump or cowl of a café racer)
I'm sure you can now understand our feelings about them lol
 

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I'm sure you can now understand our feelings about them lol
Yeah - I can. But the OP asked a reasonable question without knowing the consensus of a few members here regarding brat bikes or anything that is not a purist's concept of a cafe racer. So, is it too hard to give the guy some simple advice?
 

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Yeah right, I've been on this forum for less than a year and already have a feel for the how cutthroat it is. Glad I'm only building one cafe racer. IMHO I always thought brats were more for flat track racing on dirt, but I mean FLAT like even Enduro bikes have more ups and downs and dirt bikes are definitely getting air
 
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