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It actually has a front fender now. Had to get some different fork lowers to fit the fender under the Tarozzi fork brace. the heretical Anachronism front brake is a guilty pleasure of mine. It stops easily as well as the original disc. New linings and shoes helped.
The swing arm is actually a modern copy of a 70's part (Calfab). Chris Redpath (MotoGPwerks) made it. Follow that guy.
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bitchen bike !!

that front brake i am sure is far better than the low friction stock lashup
if you really want to get the most out of it there is one extra step to perform after getting the brake shoes to make contact ,(light contact just scrubbing),as close as you can at the same time
braking at that point should be very good but it is not optimal because the cam that is connected by the linkage rod is relying on 2 extra bushing/clevis pin fits that are not always fully able to transnmit the same force into the cam until the pins seat fully, wear and slop and minor inaccuracys in the fits all ads up to an accumalative error
the good thing about the last step i always perform and am suggesting you try is it is very simple and easy to retore back to the starting point
test riding is the best part bring the 2 small wrenches you need to change the length of the linkage rod
and then after using the brake getting it warmed up and you have that immediate memory of how it performs
stop somewhere safe off the road enjoy the scenery and lengthen the link rods...oh 1/2 a turn
this gives the linked cam a slight head start a tiny bit of extra movement to fully bed in the link rod joints so that when full braking is used the actual force of contact is closer to equal on both shoes
 

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Nice idea but its a standard Gt750J brake, it weights a tonne and isn't much good. A couple of big tugs on the lever to get it nice and hot, the 3rd tug will see it fade and you planted into the back of 3 tonne SUV. The Honda brake in good nick with dual carbon pads will perform ok time after time or just double disc with Honda standard equipment with modified leg mounting bracket or buy the correct casting from Bernie Saunders. I guess its about the look if so the are far better 4ls out there.

A TLS brake is best set up in a lathe, set the shoes sitting at rest on the cams, measure the drum then shim the shoes equally to achieve the drum measurement on the shoes linings - where exactly on the linings will dictate how fast the brake comes on. Spin up at slow speed and machine the linings so all is square/centralised on the spindle and the lead edge is the same on both shoes, file the lead edge to prevent grabbing. Remove and fit the link rod adjusted correctly. Simple.

Pretty bike though.
 

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Nice idea but its a standard Gt750J brake, it weights a tonne and isn't much good. A couple of big tugs on the lever to get it nice and hot, the 3rd tug will see it fade and you planted into the back of 3 tonne SUV. The Honda brake in good nick with dual carbon pads will perform ok time after time or just double disc with Honda standard equipment with modified leg mounting bracket or buy the correct casting from Bernie Saunders. I guess its about the look if so the are far better 4ls out there.

A TLS brake is best set up in a lathe, set the shoes sitting at rest on the cams, measure the drum then shim the shoes equally to achieve the drum measurement on the shoes linings - where exactly on the linings will dictate how fast the brake comes on. Spin up at slow speed and machine the linings so all is square/centralised on the spindle and the lead edge is the same on both shoes, file the lead edge to prevent grabbing. Remove and fit the link rod adjusted correctly. Simple.

Pretty bike though.
arcing the shoes is great but it doesnt address the point i was making
and another way to get a grasp of what i was trying to say
if both brake cam shafts rotated on highly precision practicall zero clearance bearing of some kind ,and if the linkage rod did not flex at all and if the linkage rod clevis connections were some kind of bearing with zero clearance and if the cam surfaces were an exact in paralell situiation, to the shoe/cam contact patch...then in this situation adjusting so the arced in shoes contact at the same time would pretty much garuantee that the actual pressure trasmitted to each shoe begins equally and stays equal no matter how hard a panic pilot tries to stretch the cable
but none of those above items truly exist in a tls brake and the error on any of them varies per brake mfg and wear
i only suggest that unless you give the linked shoe a tiny headstart so anything with a variation fully gets into contact to transmit force then it will not be doing as much work
its very simple a small detail thing that i figured out to try
i may have come up with the definitve adjusting procedure i have proven to myself with testing on my honda you are just the guy to test out the method
sometimes things are so simple they get overlooked everybody is adjusting for even contact that is good but apparently i am the only one that really thought past that
ideally a load cell would be positioned to read the actual force that the shoe is contacting the drum with
but the method i am promoting can only be accepted to those with an open mind and realize that everything has room for improvement even a goddam adjusting method that hasn't changed in a century
it is a simple harmless thing to try and provable yay or nay by testing but getting back to the arcing is best bite with some dead space down by the stationary location
if so or some other pattern it is an intresting thing to know
 

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Just buy a brake that's well made. Over time stuff wears but you still need to baseline the brake plate, cams and shoes before you start playing with tie rod adjustment. One also needs to consider how the brake shoe attach to the plate, non leading edge Norton for example have a pivot pin but Triumph / BSA do not so self centre.

I understand your point completely by the way and there is definitely a "touch" required when adjusting for equal shoe lift for me its just a couple of spanners on the pivot nuts pushing the shoes into contact with the drum (equal pressure) and adjust the tie rod accordingly understanding any wear in the clevis joints.
 

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Just buy a brake that's well made. Over time stuff wears but you still need to baseline the brake plate, cams and shoes before you start playing with tie rod adjustment. One also needs to consider how the brake shoe attach to the plate, non leading edge Norton for example have a pivot pin but Triumph / BSA do not so self centre.

I understand your point completely by the way and there is definitely a "touch" required when adjusting for equal shoe lift for me its just a couple of spanners on the pivot nuts pushing the shoes into contact with the drum (equal pressure) and adjust the tie rod accordingly understanding any wear in the clevis joints.
yes yes i understand exactly how to do the age old procedure
but you are still missing the point you cannot in the shop static tell if the shoes are still getting equal force applied in hard braking the brake i applied the final tweak on was in very good condition
i back off (shorten the link rod) and then using cable housing adjusters bring in the "main shoe "is what i call it until there is drag pull the lever to add force and if the drag still there then lengthen the link rod to achieve "about" double the amount of drag on the linked shoe
pull the lever hard make sure there is no change
curiosity had been knawing at me and on one long downhill twisty road brake all warmed up i stopped and went maybe half turn longer on link rod
get back on and ride and it was noticably better very noticable
tried a full turn and that didnt make much more improvement so i kept it there ..
little 160mm drum on the sl350 and stoppies were doable after that
so i know it can work was just wondering if you had an open mind to try it sometime
maybe you dont test ride the machines you work on at all
curently i am not using a tls i went to an iron disc off a husky for the 350
all single cam drum brakes have one leading shoe and there is a way to make the trailing shoe do a bit more work
yamaha came up with the idea and applied it one year model on the yz250 but then went tls the next year
 

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yes yes i understand exactly how to do the age old procedure
but you are still missing the point you cannot in the shop static tell if the shoes are still getting equal force applied in hard braking the brake i applied the final tweak on was in very good condition
i back off (shorten the link rod) and then using cable housing adjusters bring in the "main shoe "is what i call it until there is drag pull the lever to add force and if the drag still there then lengthen the link rod to achieve "about" double the amount of drag on the linked shoe
pull the lever hard make sure there is no change
curiosity had been knawing at me and on one long downhill twisty road brake all warmed up i stopped and went maybe half turn longer on link rod
get back on and ride and it was noticably better very noticable
tried a full turn and that didnt make much more improvement so i kept it there ..
little 160mm drum on the sl350 and stoppies were doable after that
so i know it can work was just wondering if you had an open mind to try it sometime
maybe you dont test ride the machines you work on at all
curently i am not using a tls i went to an iron disc off a husky for the 350
all single cam drum brakes have one leading shoe and there is a way to make the trailing shoe do a bit more work
yamaha came up with the idea and applied it one year model on the yz250 but then went tls the next year
I have built more race machines and I mean race machines not parlour pooches than I care to remember. Please don't presume to know my work practices or experience level, whether I test ride a bike or not. No theorising, no wondering just lots of practical experience.

You should try setting one of these up you might just blow a gasket.

image2.JPG

END.
 

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I have built more race machines and I mean race machines not parlour pooches than I care to remember. Please don't presume to know my work practices or experience level, whether I test ride a bike or not. No theorising, no wondering just lots of practical experience.

You should try setting one of these up you might just blow a gasket.

View attachment 74962

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that wouldn't bother me in the least
i get it your an old dog that cannot be further trained
 

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DT3 Cafe

Thought I would share my build on this site, been reading around on here a bit. This was my first bike build and is always changing. I live out in the country so I mainly rip this bike around on twisty back roads and occasionally take it in to town.

Some things ive done to the bike:
avon roadrider tires
Mikuni tm32 flat slide carburetor
boyeson reeds
custom expansion chamber
R5 front end with 2ls front brake
bronze swingarm bushings
And other things here and there

Since this picture i've also put on a GYT high compression head and switched out the K&N for a foam UNI filter

Soon Ive been planning to have the jug ported and fit a vforce reed cage and switch the 32mm carb to a 38

dt3.png
 

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Thought I would share my build on this site, been reading around on here a bit.
Where's your fork brace, blinkers and cusioned seat Jean Ralphio?

add those things and it should be a good rider
 

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speedometer?
Do a lot of indoor riding do you :rolleyes:

... hope you stick around, I want to see if you can actually get it to work decent at idle or anything less the half throttle with a 38mm carb on a 250.
 

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Well like I said for the most part its back roads for me, so I just kinda go. Speedo wont keep me from going over the speed limit. But after riding for a while it would be nice to have a reference of how fast im going and i have been trying to find one that I like, I just ordered a tach so that will be going on as well

Edit: I will post updates after i get it ported and start working on tuning with that carburetor
 

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Wouldn't be street legal without one, maybe you should download the speedometer app and mount your iPhone on the handlebars, they might let you away with that.
Steel rims and stock enduro rear shocks too! I'll give you this, you got more guts then I do to post it in the ultimate cafe racer thread, just a heads up; people don't hold back the criticism or the complements on this site.
 

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Ive been thinking about trying that gps speedo app for my phone and now that you suggest it I think I will until I can get a good speedo working. Have also been looking at some Hagons with adjustable dampening for the rear, the stock ones are leaky and too stiff for my tiny ass. Thanks for the feedback!
 

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When you changed the reeds to Boyeson fibre reeds did you bend the limiting stops back a little bit so they open further? ... that worked good on the TY250's



Dunstall fibreglass front fender

weighs almost nothing, you can trim it to bikini like coverage and it will keep some of the road spray, grit and dog shit off your face shield and everything else, highly recommended. And that chopper license plate bracket :/ imho that looks totally stupid, does nothing to catch rear wheel spray, requires additional lighting, increases unsprung weight and will probably cut your leg some day. ... also illegal in Saskatchewan lol not that you will ever ride there.

btw: you don't want squishy soft rear spring holders on a performance motorcycle, your rear suspension should be stiff like a formula 1 race car, not go boing boing down the road like a Roadglide ;) if they are that stiff your shocks are possibly bent.
 

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Didn't know about that trick, I did put in the stop spacers that came with the reeds though

Nice fender. I was wondering if anyone would see that plate mount hiding back there

By stiff I guess i mean they are firm, which is fine, i dont know a whole lot about road suspension yet but when I sit on the bike there is no sag in the back, partly because ive lightened the bike a bit from stock and also because im only 105 lbs
 

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I'm a lightweight too but those stock shocks really are crap by comparison to almost anything that has a nitrogen gas design, you might not notice it until they get warm during spirited riding and then they turn into 7$ spring holders. lol that's about what they originally cost Yamaha to put on there and when it comes to rear shocks, you pretty much get what you pay for.
Alloy rims is a nice upgrade if you want it to actually qualify it as an 'ultimate cafe racer' ;)
Your rear brake has a full floating brake stay and that is a nice touch, that will help control rear wheel hop during hard braking on bumpy road surfaces once you upgrade those shocks.
The pipe is very nice, love that, hate your seat but there is only so much you can do with the stock steel enduro tank on there.


... and pre-mix? that must be a bitch when you need to fuel up at a gas station.
 
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