Cafe Racer Forum banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Just curious, I just picked up an '82 XJ 400, that I was told was an XS by the add. I worked at a Yamaha dealer in 1987,but cannot recall the J line differences. I'm assuming frame, with no down tube ? I already own a 1975 XS650. Anyone remember ? By the way, it's a DOHC twin.<p>XS, XJ, XV, XZ, too much to recall, and no internet TECH info.[?]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
290 Posts
Sounds like you have an XS400J. XS - vertical twin, XJ - inline-4, XV - v-twin (viragos), XZ was liquid v-twin (visions). The "J" denotes the year, in this case 1983. "K" would be 1984, easy pattern there. If you had an RJ it would be a Seca, otherwise it's a Maxim.

I worked about 6 years in a Yamaha shop, never saw many 400s of any flavor. Seems to be more of a Euro thing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
830 Posts
Easy way to tell is by looking at the bodywork and wheels. The Seca cast wheels had four sets of two parallel spokes in a straight line angular bodywork and a mini "boattail" that came to a point. The Maxim has those gawdawful swirly-pattern cast wheels and the bodywork had no tail section to speak of and a more rounded tank.

The engine was basically the center two cylinders off a XJ750 (slightly larger bores, though)with the requisite bottom-end shrink-wrapping. All XJ750 hot-rodding tricks apply (forged pistons, more aggressive cam profiles, etc). Make your own XJ400 cams by getting some 750 cams and cutting them down. Bearing journal spacing is the same. Hitachi carbs, though - ugh.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
830 Posts
Easy way to tell is by looking at the bodywork and wheels. The Seca cast wheels had four sets of two parallel spokes in a straight line angular bodywork and a mini "boattail" that came to a point. The Maxim has those gawdawful swirly-pattern cast wheels and the bodywork had no tail section to speak of and a more rounded tank.

The engine was basically the center two cylinders off a XJ750 (slightly larger bores, though)with the requisite bottom-end shrink-wrapping. All XJ750 hot-rodding tricks apply (forged pistons, more aggressive cam profiles, etc). Make your own XJ400 cams by getting some 750 cams and cutting them down. Bearing journal spacing is the same. Hitachi carbs, though - ugh.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top