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Discussion Starter #1

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C'mon now lil Geeto,

The Norley is bid to $16M with a day and a half left. The Manx has another 4 days left. Of course I think the Manx auction has issues. It's a race bike that's not prepped for racing. No title - bill of sale only so that means after spending $36M you still have to jump through some hoops to put it on the road or spend some more money to race prep. And how many people have a spare $30M burning a hole in their pocket these days?

In the end I suspect neither bike will sell and the Norley is bid to about what the market will bear currently.....

After all, I could claim Barry Sheene once farted on the seat of one of my T500's and put it up for sale for silly money. Doesn't mean I'm going to get it....

Jim
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Manx bikes never had titles as they were always race bikes and never road legal. It doesn't mean people didn't build road legal Manx's, Evan Wilcox had one, but they didn't start out that way.

I just thought it was funny that the nortley had a BIN $10k higher than the Manx.

You buy a Manx you buy an investment piece. You buy the nortley you buy a toy that will lose money before it becomes collectible. The tradeoff is you can ride the nortley on the street.
 

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no 59 badge on the manx kerry. hence the projected value.
 

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its what? not 2000?
i'll stick with K, lest my katana be a DCLXXIII inline IV with a XIX inch front wheel.
 

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I use K for 1000, as Kilo. Its the greek use, and more popular in the drug trade. M is the roman numeral use. Could go either way, but in my business M is 1,000,000.

But then again I say "c-note" for a hundred dollar bill. "c" being the roman numberal for 100. I'm a walking contradiction.
 

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The price for the Manx is not that bad as prices go. The only thing that really bothers me is the gearbox. Its a road going laydown not a correct Manx box. Which, I think, is the reason there is no megga on it.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
If you read the description hoof the seller says it has the road gearbox cover and mechanisim so a kicker could be fitted. He says he has the original parts that go with it.

Own a Manx and you find yourself in the shared experience and company of a lot of road racing's legends from hailwood to Geoff Duke, plus the designers like mccandless. Own the nortly and you are channeling......an overweight Frenchman from Florida......
 

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For $36 grand I would want more than a parts bin bitsa special, which that manx is. Of course I have no idea what a matching numbers original bike would go for...

But, I do know that for that price I would want the right side rearset and shift linkage to be there, along with a muffler.
 

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The Norley may have sold at auction for $45,000 but, that was really a charity donation.
The bidding is closer to what it's really worth (the sum of it's parts with a little bit of labour thrown in for assembly)
$18~20K would be realistic, but, just about anyone here could build the same or better for less (assuming we had 12~15K 'lost' down the back of the sofa :D)
 

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Manx Nortons never had "matching numbers" per se. They were only made for a few months each year as the company that did all of the machining for Norton had to shut down and set up for the task. You couldn't just walk into your Norton dealer and order a Manx. They were only sold to racers with "form". Certain sponsors and engine builders could buy engines with no numbers stamped on them.

I had a Manx engine that was numbered RD101. Which was a Reg Dearden engine. They were all raced and any Manx that still had its original engine would be fairly rare. The last year or so of Manx Nortons were all built from parts they had on the shelf.

You have to remember that up until about 1970 they were raced competitively (or reasonably competitively). The next five years they were just old uncompetitive bikes and then they became collectable.

Throw in the fact that formula three car racing was in its heyday in the 50s and the most popular engine for those cars was a Manx and there were a lot of engineless Manx frames laying about. Norton wouldn't sell only engines (with the above exceptions) so all the car builders had to buy complete Manx Nortons and pull the engine and gearbox from them. So if you ever wondered how the Triton craze got started thats part of the answer.

Geet. I didn't read the part about him having the Manx gearbox parts. I didn't know laydown stuff would interchange. You learn something new every day.
 
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