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Discussion Starter #121 (Edited)
All right, I never got the tach to work on that Chinese cheapo unit. I fought it every way I knew how. Tried to hook up to the coil...no dice. Inductively wrapping the signal wire around an HT lead....nope. The only sgnal I could register at all was to tap into one of the AC leads at the reg/rec, and that only resulted in a few twitches at the needle.

All the lights and the speed signal worked fine, so earlier this summer, I rigged up the gauge on the original gauge bracket alongside the OEM tach so I could ride it around.
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I found a n All-in-one gauge that looked promising from Daytona Gauges. It is the Velona 80, and it sells for about $200 US. The problem is that they have a couple versions, and the only ones that I could find in the States were either the version that has the speedo as the needle, or the one that has a 9000 RPM tach needle. I did find the one I wanted (15K RPM needle, and speed in the digital display) offered by a company in the UK (https://digital-speedos.co.uk). I decided to throw the dice and spent the $193 to have one shipped over to me.

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It comes with a small V-bracket and plenty of wire length, and even has wire extensions to connect to the bullet connectors on the harness. Instructions are in English, easy to understand and include several differrent set-up methods. For instance, Speed can be set manually by wheel circumference and pulses per revolution, or you can ride at 40 kph (or MPH) and hit the set button, or you can ride exactly 1km and set it. I chose manual because I already knew my tire circumference and PPR.
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I decided to use the bracket I made for the cheapo unit because it allowed me to rubber mount the gauge, but I needed to modify it just a bit to clear the wire harnesses because they exit the gauge at the bottom. So, I put a small hump in the bracket.
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I also didn't want to use the long wire lengths that they gave me, and I had already put a connector on the bike for the other unit, so I cut the wires to length and pinned the connector 1/2 I had from before to mate with the connector I installed for the other gauge.
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One word of caution: The two harnesses that come out of the unit both have the same color wires in them, so it is best to pin one at a time and insert the pins in the connector before cutting the other harness. so you don't get them mixed up.

I didn't have any luck hooking up the tach signal to the coil (+), but wrapping the signal wire around the plug wire works wonderfully.
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I put a bullet connector in line so I can remove (or move) the coil or plug wire if necessary without having to disturb the induction loop. Then I taped it up to hold it secure and make it disappear.
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Here it is all finished up.
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The only thing left is to cap the OEM mechanical tach drive. I will most likely use a large vacuum cap to cover it up and keep dirt out.
 

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Discussion Starter #122
Took the “old” bike out for a few giggles. It doesn’t have the nice table manners of the R6, and it takes a lot to get it through Deals Gap at even 2/3 the speed. But man, it snarls, howls and gives a much more visceral experience doing it!

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Discussion Starter #123
Since my last posts have disappeared, and I don't want to spend the time to type all of that again just for it to get lost in the cosmos.....again.....I'll just "quick sum up":

Chinese all-in-one gauge; bad. Never got the tach working, but used it for a speedo on the OEM bracket for most of the season.
Took a chance on a $200 Daytona Velona 80 gauge. Had to order from UK (digital-speedos.co.uk) because I couldn't find the version I wanted in the US (15K RPM dial, speedo digital LCD)
Wired it up using the connectors I had for the Chinese gauge, and modified the bracket I made for the other gauge.
I used the mag pick-up from the Chinese Gauge for the speed signal. The tach signal did not work wired directly to the coil, but works great inductively looped around the #3 HT plug wire.

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And I went for a ride......
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Discussion Starter #124 (Edited)
The clubman bars were always a temporary thing. I could never get the angle right to be comfortable for my wrists. The sweep back angle was too extreme and would be more natural if they had a little flatter sweep. I assumed that I would get clip-ons at some point, but I realized that clip-ons would require a change to the head light mount, because the headlight brackets occupy the real estate where the clip-ons would be. So.......

Superbike bars!

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The ones I found are a copy of an old K&N bend that has a slight down turn at the ends, so the wrists are at a more natural rotation and aren't rotated up.

Unfortunately, my brake lines are about 2 inches too short, so I am waiting for new ones to arrive....
 

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Discussion Starter #125 (Edited)
I got the brake lines in and installed, and went to take the bike for a ride to assess the new bars before putting the bike up for the winter......and as I stated in another thread, I hate old carburetors and ethanol gas. I rode the bike a bit over the season, but not nearly enough. Also, it was sitting for a couple months because of travel, waiting on brake lines.....and choosing to take the R6 out more often instead of the temperamental old bike, etc., etc.

Anyway, I turned on the petcock, and had gas pouring out of the carbs. Not from the bowl overflows, but from the fuel fill tee joint.
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So off the carbs came
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The joint is a rubber coated pot metal fitting. No o-rings to replace. (the two outside joints do have replaceable o-rings) I found some replacement joints on eBay that are machined Aluminum, with o-rings.
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I was able to snake the joints out without completely disassembling the rack. Just removing the screws that hold the individual carbs to the rack gave me enough movement to get the joints out.
One of the issues I have had with these carbs is that there is no room for a regular hose clamp on the tee joint. Before, I had used safety wire wrapped around the hose, but that kind of dug into the rubber more than I was comfortable with. So I had another idea: Take a standard hose clamp:
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Cut the screw housing off, and use the safety wire to pull it tight, without concentrating the stress of the wire on the rubber.
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All back together:
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ethanol fuel requires the use of some good fuel line...that car stuff ain't gettin it, neither is the typical clear pvc (or whatever the fuck it is) stuff from your local bike shop. I been using the grey stuff from motion pro, or oem Honda has good shit too, no clamps necessary unless to pass tech
 

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Just treat pump gas that contains ethanol like it is oxygenated fuel :/ because I'm pretty sure that is exactly what it is.
So basically: store it in steel and not plastic, reduce it's exposure to air and water contamination because it is hygroscopic, do your darnedest to keep it away from brass, rubber, plastic, paint or parts that alcohol might cause to oxidize or penetrate, use it before it gets old because it has a shelf life similar to milk.
 

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I got the brake lines in and installed, and went to take the bike for a ride to assess the new bars before putting the bike up for the winter......and as I stated in another thread, I hate old carburetors and ethanol gas. I rode the bike a bit over the season, but not nearly enough. Also, it was sitting for a couple months because of travel, waiting on brake lines.....and choosing to take the R6 out more often instead of the temperamental old bike, etc., etc.

Anyway, I turned on the petcock, and had gas pouring out of the carbs. Not from the bowl overflows, but from the fuel fill tee joint.
View attachment 95957

So off the carbs came
View attachment 95959

The joint is a rubber coated pot metal fitting. No o-rings to replace. (the two outside joints do have replaceable o-rings) I found some replacement joints on eBay that are machined Aluminum, with o-rings.
View attachment 95961

I was able to snake the joints out without completely disassembling the rack. Just removing the screws that hold the individual carbs to the rack gave me enough movement to get the joints out.
One of the issues I have had with these carbs is that there is no room for a regular hose clamp on the tee joint. Before, I had used safety wire wrapped around the hose, but that kind of dug into the rubber more than I was comfortable with. So I had another idea: Take a standard hose clamp:
View attachment 95963
Cut the screw housing off, and use the safety wire to pull it tight, without concentrating the stress of the wire on the rubber.
View attachment 95965

All back together:
View attachment 95967
i thought i was the only one on these boards with a degree in nigerian engineering
srsly tho that is the hard way and you are forcing the fuel line into a not round shape
the only type that maintain roundness are
the spring clamps that are made for fuel line ,like come with an inline filter for your old car those are best bet
 

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Discussion Starter #131 (Edited)
The hose isn’t being forced in any shape. There isn’t much tension on the band. Just enough pressure to prevent the hose sliding over the barb on the fitting.

And the devices you are referring to? I call them Satan Clamps, because that is who I am convinced was the original designer. There isn’t enough room for one of those, either. The two protrusions that face the center prevent the ability to get a pair of needle nose in there. And I am afraid the tabs would hit the protrusions, acting to relieve the clamp pressure. It is a really tight space.....specially with that thick fuel hose that’s on it.
 

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You need band and buckle clamps, or band clamps. They are both low profile, much more reliable and they get a good tight seal. McMaster sells kits for the band and buckle clamps, or the band clamps per unit.

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Discussion Starter #134
So I took the bike out with the new bars and it was comfortable....until the pace wicked up a bit. I found that if I didn’t trail brake all the way past the apex of every curve, the front end would start skipping and try to fold up on me. It felt good under braking, but mid corner it was scary. Symptoms that point to either too much spring rate, or lack of rebound damping.

With the new bars, my new body position took weight off the front end. So the first step was to remove it 12mm preload spacers I had on top of the springs. I took the bike out again and it was better, but the front still seemed a little bit unsettled. The next step was to increase the fork oil wt. So I went from 15wt to 20wt. Hopefully that will cure the front end blues.
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I like people that aren't afraid to experiment with and dial in the forks...

So what you are saying is by trailing the brakes, you are forcing the front end to stay down. Once you let off the brakes, the front springs up too fast and feels vague.

Makes sense. increasing rebound dampening and a thicker oil will slow the rebound but ultimately you might need a lighter front spring.
Dropping the front end will help with weight transfer onto the front and help keep the front loaded.

keep it up and post your results...

Oh yeah, loose head bearing preload and wheel bearings can cause a similar situation as well as tire condition and way off tire pressures.
 

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Discussion Starter #136 (Edited)
With the 20wt oil, and the preload spacers removed, the bike felt much better entering corners and through the middle of the turn. The absolute need to trail brake hard into a turn to avoid chatter, and the tendency of the front wheel to fold mid-corner were gone. The only issue was that the front felt a bit sloppy at the top of the stroke. I could feel the lack of any spring tension at full extension.

One of the guys I regularly hang out with at the Deals Gap restaurant had a small air pump in his bag, so I put 5 psi in each leg and made a few more passes. It was like a switch got turned on! I was literally giggling in my helmet because it was handling so well.

That feeling of euphoria that happens when a bike is railing through turns better than it was ever designed to do is something the angle grinder wielding “art-bike” crowd will never experience..... And that is a shame!

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Holy I wish I had an autobahn like that near where I live :|

you should invest in a low pressure air gauge and a mini air pump like the one I carry for the trials bikes.
 

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I was literally giggling in my helmet because it was handling so well.
This is the same feeling I'm having with my trackbike at the moment.
I'm riding yesterday and thinking, damn, this thing is doing everything I'm asking it to do. And with minimal effort, too. The only limit is how hard to I want to push it on the street.
It's a great feeling...

And most of it has to do with setting up the bike rather than expensive new parts. Granted an older bike (30-40yo) is gonna benefit more from newer technology...

Of course that means actually riding the bike to know where it needs attention. Another thing that the artsy-fartsy crowd doesn't understand either...
 

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Discussion Starter #139 (Edited)
This is the same feeling I'm having with my trackbike at the moment.
I'm riding yesterday and thinking, damn, this thing is doing everything I'm asking it to do. And with minimal effort, too. The only limit is how hard to I want to push it on the street.
It's a great feeling...

And most of it has to do with setting up the bike rather than expensive new parts. Granted an older bike (30-40yo) is gonna benefit more from newer technology...

Of course that means actually riding the bike to know where it needs attention. Another thing that the artsy-fartsy crowd doesn't understand either...
I’ve only had my R6 out once, this season. I’ve been out on the GS about a half dozen times, so far. The R6 is so much easier to get through the road, at a much faster pace, but the old bike is much more visceral and is becoming just as much fun.....even at a 10-15 mph slower pace.
 

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Hi,

this is Lukas from Germany. I also wrote you an private message, but I Think you did not see it yet.

I fortuitously found your thread in Google about the pod filters on Mikuni VM22 carbs on a 1979 Suzuki GS 550.

I am also building up a GS550 and it was very interesting for me to see your pictures that with normal low cost pod filters the air passages are blocked / could be blocked. So I decided to buy the K&N pod filters shown in your thread.

And now my question:
Could you please tell me your carb settings with the K&N installed? Main jet size, pilot jet, Needle,..?

That would be very great and a big support for me and my project

Thank you.
Best regards
Lukas
 
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